How Skillifying Can Make our Institutions More Employer-Friendly

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Kelly Ryan Bailey, Global Skills Evangelist at Emsi joined the podcast to talk about forging new partnerships with local employers by creating a shared skills language between us.

The majority of students that come toour schools are coming because their goal is to get a job from move forwardin their career. You're listening to enrollment growth university from Helix Education, thebest professional development podcast for higher education leaders looking to grow enrollment at their collegeor university. Whether you're looking for fresh enrollment growth techniques and strategies or toolsand resources, you've come to the right place. Let's get into the show. Welcome back to enrollment growth university, a proud member of the connect Evupodcast network. I'm Eric Olson with Helix Education, and we're here today withKelly Ryan Bailey, Global Skills Evangelist at MC and host of the innovation andskills based hiring and learning podcast. Let's talk about skills baby, Kelly.It's great to have you on the show. Thank you so much for having me. Eric, really excited to talk with you today about forging new partnershipswith local employers by creating a shared skills...

...language between us. Before we diginto that, can you give the listeners a little bit of background of bothMC and your role? They're sure, of course so. Mzy Is alabor market analytics firm based in Moscow Idaho, but they actually work thelobally. Myrole there is really she you facilitate change to a skill based hiring andlearning economy through open skill standards, innovative products and services and global initiatives andpartnerships. I love it's so so excited about this conversation. Let's start onthe scary side and then work our way back to hope by the end.Kelly, so many colleges have increased their focus on employer partnerships as enrollment growthchannels. But scare us a little bit. Why don't employers need colleges anymore?Well, in all honesty, there are so many alternative learning and developmentoptions now. Employers typically need to move...

...a lot faster than traditional higher educationcan move. So they are looking at these alternative resources really closely and partneringwith them. You know, one example would be late last year Ronstad partneredwith you to me, and you know obviously plenty more examples like that.But because they need those employees up skilled in a very quick fashion, theyhave a lot of options now, and so in order to secure new employerpartnerships, you believe it's more important than ever for institutions to prove and showtheir value to an employer. Can you walk us through your recent case studywith southern New Hampshire University and how they're attempting to do that by deconstructing theirprograms into a shared skills language for employers, of course. So you know,I think the work that we're doing with Snhu is really fascinating because theidea is that what higher education offers is...

...extremely valuable. The biggest issue isjust that employers don't understand it, because they understand but they need in termsof skills and that's not necessarily what higher education talks about when they're talking aboutwhat they offer in terms of program so at Snhu they're working with MV toactually break down all of their programs, courses, everything they offer into skillsand that common language of skills that employers use. That envy has kindly opensource as available to everyone higher education organizations, you know, government, etc.And they're allowing we call it here, skillifying education. But but essentially youknow, they're they're just making it so that they understand and have insome visible fashion what they're teaching in terms of field. So let's walk throughan example of what this would look like. To establish this kind of employer partnership. Let's say the institution is doing...

...a really good job listening. They'rehearing a local employer who is looking to both upscale their current workforce as wellas higher in a new set of skills. What are in the institutions next steps, after hearing those problems, to create a program proposal from that?Well, let's talk about this sort of like before you actually understood the skillsthat you taught in your programs, right, so, traditionally, what would happenwhen an employer came to you as an institution to ask that question?You serve scramble and create this brand new custom curriculum because you wanted to makesure that right you are offering what theyanced for. But the thing is thatonce you actually have visibility into the skills that you're offering in your program sortof broken down to its smallest component, let's say in the majority of schools, that's at a course level, you then have the ability to use whatyou already have created at your fingertips to...

...cust you know, when I saycustom, I mean just reshuffle and repackage courses that you already have into somethinglike a badge or a micro credential or you know whatever flavor of that youoffer. Yeah, and so you mentioned about, you know, trying notto scare us the way in terms of this hyper customization. But I'm suremost of our academic listeners are have gotten those conversations before where it's a Collie, we have to create a new, completely customed program for their employer.I'm sure there's still some fear in the lift involved in creating these one offs, even for a big potential feeder employer. Why does that big lift not necessarilyhave to be the case once you scalify your program yeah, I think, you know, I really would envy has created and really wonderful software thatsort of handles this. But I think just generally speaking, and I cantalk about that a little bit more specifically...

...if you're interested, but generally speakingit's sort of this. You know, it's more the visibility. So ifI can paint a picture for the listeners in their minds, the idea beingthat what if I could take let's say a syllabus document or a course descriptionand I could actually see what skills I'm talking about and then make that comparisonto also what is going on in the labor market to determine, you know, am I actually talking about all of the skills that I'm teaching in theway that employers understand and almost have it available in a software interface where Ithen can search and quickly and easily just click on a few courses based onthe skills that this employers looking for to create that custom program. And again, I say custom loosely because, of course right it's this is custom ina very different way. It's a repackaged solution as opposed to creating from scratch. To what are some other benefits of...

...that repackaging? If we are movingfrom this storytelling experience where we are telling the outcomes of our program but nowwe're telling it from a skills perspective, how can this scalified program storytelling alsohelp us better recruit new students? Well, on the flip side, just asan as you're noticing now with employers, you know, them understanding the returnon investment in partnering with you as an institution, these same hugely enormousoptions are also available to students when it comes to what option, you know, where they want to turn for their education and learning needs. So Ithink the idea being that students are changing. You know, the average person hasten jobs throughout their life. We're living longer, there's so many things. You know, the labor market is changing so quickly that they've really lookedat their ability to, let's say, sit down for that four year degree, maybe in a slightly different way.

And so when you're able to expressto them you know, hey, this is really what you're learning, it'ssort of a you know, marketing, because of course you know about allthese other resources out there that are sharing the same messages as return on investmentwith your potential students, and so you're really talking about the value that you'rebringing to them and focusing in on their goals right, because the majority ofstudents that come to our schools are coming because their goal is to get ajob from move forward in their career. You mentioned this focus on helping usto evolve what our learning economy looks like. Can you give us a future sneakpeak? Ten years from now, let's say a lot more institutions aretaking this skillified methodology to create, construct and customize their programs. What doesthat future learning economy look like, both from a student perspective and from anemployer perspective. In all honesty, I think the three work more closely together, meaning the students, employees, the...

...employers and, of course, theeducation institutions. But the way that I see this, in all honesty,I think it's not going to be surprising to hear that you know my takeand and this is not the envy take, this is the Kelly Ryan hilly take. Is that you know. I will just preface with that. Mytake is that in that time frame we're going to start to see less statusof a degree holder as opposed to how quickly I can move an upskill myselfthrough my life, career and learning pathway and the idea that I need tostep in and out of education and and I would love to have a trustedresource in my alma mater to turn to, maybe I'm working towards a bachelor's degreeor a master's degree or more throughout that life. But I need moreoptions and I need faster, quicker options, as does my employer. So that'skind of the vision that I see...

...when someone asks me about what doesthis future of education and work look like? It's a closer tied relationship and it'sbetter return on investment for all such good stuff. Kelly, any finalnext steps? Advice per institutions who are hearing this, nodding along, slightlyterrified, but also with feelings of excitement and looking to create, or atleast progress toward the shared skills language between their institutions and their local employers?Where should they start first? Yeah, I think you know. In allhonesty, I would also say do not be scared. This is a fantasticopportunity for transformation and growth for your institution and those that you serve, whichis a great place to be. There's so many options. Of course,since I am here today on behalf of MV, you know what I suggest, and I'm here, you know, on behalf of Mv because I trulybelieve in the work that we're doing it.

MV IS A number one. Theyhave an open sourced skills library that any institution or organization can use,and it's a great way to start to understand what ways you can look atyour curriculum in this shared skills language of employers. There are also some freeresources on the skilled website, which is skilled dot MZ Datacom, that allowyou to actually copy and paste in a syllabus document or course description and startto view what type of skills you are talking about in your curriculum, becausethere are times to remember that it's not that you are not teaching the skills, you may not be communicating them in your course descriptions and your syllabus document. So that is a great sort of entry level place to start. Andthen, of course, if you really want to get into this and startto look at this more broadly across all of the curriculum that you offer.Your institution, envy, is just a...

...few weeks shy of releasing their softwaresolution around this, which is called Skillaby, and so I highly suggest that isthe technology that we tested out with groups like southern New Hampshire University andothers, and it has made a whole host of difference in the way thatthey can look at their curriculum and creating again, like I said, repackagedsolutions for employer partnerships and other potential partnerships. Kelly, thanks so much of yourtime today. What's the best place for listeners to connect with you ifthey have any follow up questions? I am probably most active on Linkedin andI'm there at Kelly Ryan Bailey. I'm also on twitter if anyone wants tojump over their platform or platform of choice of course. But yeah, Iwould say if you don't mind messaging me on Linkedin. That's where you canfind me and I'd love to connect with you. Awesome. Thanks so muchfor joining us today, Kelly. Thanks again, Eric. Attracting today's newpost traditional learners means adopting new enrollment strategies.

Helix educations data driven, enterprise wideapproach to enrollment growth is uniquely helping colleges and universities thrive in this neweducation landscape, and Helix has just published the second edition of their enrollment growthplaybook with fifty percent brand new content on how institutions can solve today's most pressingenrollment growth challenges, downloaded today for free at Helix Educationcom. Playbook. You'vebeen listening to enrollment growth university from Helix Education. To ensure that you nevermiss an episode, subscribe to the show in Itunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (231)