Onboarding Hybrid Learning Technology at University of Kentucky

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Dr. Kathi Kern, Associate Provost of Teaching, Learning, and Academic Innovation, and Kathy Hamperian, Executive Director of Customer Support and Student IT Enablement at University of Kentucky, joined the podcast to talk about the massive and ambitious investment they made in hybrid learning technology in preparation for this fall.

We talk all the time about the digitalnatives, yet these students need a lot of support in learning how to makethese technologies work. You're, listening to enrolment growth,university from helics education, the best professional development podcastfor higher education leaders looking to grow in Romant at their college oruniversity, whether you're looking for fresh and romant growth techniques andstrategies or tools and resources. You've come to the right place. Let'sget into the show, welcome back to Enroman GrowthUniversity, proud, member of the connect Edu podcast network, I'm EricWolson with helics education and we're here today with Dr Kathy Kerne,associate provost of teaching learning and academic inovation and CathyHanperion executive director of customer support and student. Itenablement at University of Kentucky Dtr Currand, Kathy, welcomed, wot. Theshow thanks so much. Thank you so excited to talk with you both todayabout the investment in hybrid learning technology. You made this year inpreparation for fall before we dig in. Can you get the listeners a little bitbetter understanding of both University of Kentucky and your roles there,beginning with Dr Kiren sure? Well, thank so much eric for having us. Weare a large public land grant university with around thirty onehsandstudents and locate in Lexington Kentucky, and we began a planningprocess from the moment we went remote in March twenty. Third, I think it wasof two thousand and twenty we started a planning process that would enable allpossibilities for the fall, including a residential experience, knowing thatmany of our students wanted that as well as online and Tybrid. So my rolehas been to lead the instructional mission to Shephard, that to I'm ahistory, professor by training, and so over the course of the spring andsummer. We worked with a lot of innovative, diligent faculty to get thefall courses ready to roll and Cathy...

...help us understand your role as well. Iam within the Information Technology Services Sector at the UniversityKentucky is Dr Curren has already pointed out, we're a large largeinstitution and that the technolopy is important as a a support for ourinstructional mession cathy to prepare for your hybrid fall. You upgraded thetechnology and approximately ninety percent of your classrooms talk alittle bit about that very, very ambitious process. We got a request inearly May in fact, may first to what would it take to put a livestreamingrecording device in as many classrooms as possible at the time we've beenusing echo through sixty four about ten years. At the time we had about hundredsixty four costoms that had echo three d sixty in it, so we proposed addingmore echo classrooms than adding more classrooms, with panoramic cameras touse zoom teams that kind of collaborative software to help with thetransition into a dual modality teaching. It was very aggressive. Weplaced the first order on May the Sixh with the rest of the country, and sosome of the things were a little harder to get, but we had completed our WEHAcomplete our installations in all of our classrooms by July, thirtynt Wew,it's incredibly impressive, Dr Kern. One of the biggest critiques of HybridCourses Is the concern that our remote students will feel left out of theprimary classroom discussion. How does your textsolve attempt to help solvefor this? Well, as you know, technology is a great enabler of connection. It'snot fullproof. We still have challenges, but I guess first of all e would pointto the medior rise of Zoom, something...

...that you know. In March of this year wehad a limited number of licenses. We had a university wide license, not thatmany people had taken advantage of it. Now we have thirty nine sand licenses,so you know that has really that kind of video conferencingng. You know aswell as people hang out in skites and teams. People have, I think, gottenincreasingly comfortable with connecting that way. It also allows us,of course, a chat feature. As a teacher, I think I've also been able to exploitthe possibilities of keeping my students engaged using the Google Suete.So I use a lot of Google forms to take the temperature of the class, notliterally I realize in Covid. That sounds like that. Could I temperature,but rather to ask them what they think about something using using some kindof pulling device, whether that's Google forms or mentimeter or pulleverywhere? I also use the Google docks to get students, brainstorming ideas,whether they're, remote or in the classroom, and that's been veryinteresting to watch them. POPULATA document and I've always used Googleslides and continue to use those for collaborative work, so I think thatwe've all gotten better at he the tools that are available, but it still poseschallenges that you know that students, you know, don't feel comfortable forwhatever reason. Turning on their cameras that that students candisengage- and we don't know it as easily- if somebody is you know,sitting in your class with earbuds in and and texting, you can sort of seethat and witness that behavior realize like okay, I am not engaging thisstudent, but the technology at least allows us to make these efforts toproduce a really connected classroom experience so much new technology soquickly, Dr Caren, what have the faculty and Student Training and techon boardings look like for all this new...

...technology? Well, I think that,starting with he faculty, it's been very intense and when we went remote on March thirteen,we began offering daylong drop in office hours via zoom for our faculty,and initially we did those nine to five, but then we also did them in theevenings and on the weekends, because we realized that lots of facultymembers are probably going to be preparing Monday's class on you knowSaturday afternoon. So we need to be available to people in those zoom dropin sessions. I would say that you know ninety percent of the help that peoplewere seeking was like how to do something, how to make the technologyenable them to meet this learning objective for the course. So you know,we hope that we would get to talk more about pedagogy and strategy with thefaculty, but at a least in the first few months, virtually everyone who camewas saying: How do you do this? How do you make this work, so that was thatwas really important to and as well as ongoing workshops, and then we did twobig weeks of teaching with our with our faculty. One of them was, I may, andone was in July, and we had over a thousand participants, and that waslike a week, long Simposia, where, where folks could could work onredesigning their courses for the summer or the fall in terms of students?This is a really interesting issue, because we talk all the time about thedigital natives. Yet these students need a lot of support in learning howto make these technologies work. You know they haven't necessarily used alearning management system in high school, so we have done someintroductions to canvas over the summer, but we have also recognize that asfaculty, we have to spend time teaching the tools and helping the studentsunpack that technological landscape, that is college education today, Cathy,how future forward were you trying to...

...be in these tech investments? Forexample, were you primarily focused on this kind of two month window makingsure you had what you needed to launch this hybrid fall successfully, or wereyou also trying to think about what your classroom needs might be fiveyears from now, Ei very good question? Obviously we were. We were thinkingabout how do we deliver the technology for the faculty and students in thefalse semester, but you know, as you know, technology changes with thebreeze, so we've been using echo thr sixty for ten years. It has served USreally well until the panoramic cameras, whether it's zoom or teams, like DrTurn mentioned or any other tool that comes along, we tri to select sort ofdevice or software agnostic hardware that would would allow us to use itwith whatever new technology came along. I also want to point out that Kathy'steam supplied personal WIFI spots, my fies to students and the faculty, andwe weren't sure when we began meeting an emergency operations, we weren'tsure how many people might need something like that, but but that wasreally interesting for us to see th the demand for better internet once we wentremote absolutely and we started a program last fall that every new firsttime freshman receives an IPAD that that they can keep through their careerat Thi rersy Kentucky- and this was the second hear to do that. But as that, asDr Kuren mentioned, when we went after spring break in the in the spring, whenwe went to remote we're in Kentucky the the Internetcapabilities aren't great, you know we don't want to send people to parkinglots to do their homework or to take their class. So an investment was madein the the myfis, the hot spots that people could borrow to use for theirclass work. We also trie to have some some equipment for faculty orinstructors who might need that as well...

...to borrow that, as as the time wentalong. I wanted to also add to what Dr Curn said. The partnership that that wehave with Dr Current's organization is incredible. I don't think we could doour job without getting their input. I mean they have their fingers on thepulse of the faculty and what they need and the students and what they need,because they're very active and they actually created and supported anwonderful website, teach anywhere dot, Uky Ddu, which is just jampact full ofwonderful information for a faculty or anyone who's interested. That wants togo. Look at it, but her staff has just been you know: they've been really thecorner stone to making this successful. That's so generous of you Kethy, thankyou and I can't believe I didn't think to mention the teaching or website andthe learn anywhere website that we created with the help of our marketingunit. Those are great resources and we found that you know thousands ofthousands of people from around the country have used that teach anywherewebsite, and one of my favorite things on the learn anywhere website is we hadstudents who were tutors this summer, make a series of lifehack videos and sothey're, showing in these videos the kind of technology tools that they usefor time management and to keep on top of their studies and ther, reallypriceless resources. In fact, I thought God, if I had been as organized as asthese young people yeah, so the LARN anywhere they learnanywhere. That Ukotob to is just wonderful for our students, but youknow if you get a chance, if your listeners get a chance, go take a lookat what was created there, like Dtr Krin, said with First Taff in ourWonderful Marketing Department here at the University Yeah, Wonderful and DrCarren. What's next on the list in terms of what you've seen is a new needthat you might not have seen five...

...months ago or even broader than that,what you're excited to eventually get to add your tech Arsenal moving forward?Wel that you know that's a good question. I think that part of what weneed to do is faculty is to kind of continue to get up to speed, with someof the great tools that are out there, and so for me something exciting. Thissemester has been using jam board and that's part of the Google suit and it'san interactive white board, and you know faculty can use it to teach, but Iuse it for team base learning and and have my students learn to do visualanalysis and I preload the jam board with political cartoons. So we just dida an example of the various he visual culture of theEarly Twentieth Century when women were trying to get the right to vote, andthere were many policical cartoons and Olposition to that and caricatures ofwhat would happen to the American family of women voted and childrenwould be neglected, and so the students would see this cartoon this image fromthe early twentieth century, and then they would use jam board to draw on itand to show the points of emphasis and sticky notes to make comments about theanalysis, and so it was really great for me as a teacher, to see theirlearning kind of demonstrated through this technology. So I'm I'm reallyinterested in what kind of tools are going to allow us to unveil, learningmore and to be engaged with our students learning? So I'm always. I'vealways got an eye out for that. Like what's going to help me be a betterprofessor and then I think the other issue that you made me think about Eriwith this question is: What's the future of proctoring, you know that's Um again, somethingthat you know. We had a little interest in online proctoring before the remoteteaching and then suddenly a huge demand for online proctoring, and sohow do you do that? How do you do that in a way that respects students privacyconcerns? How do you do that in a way...

...that doesn't cost your students yetanother fee to complete their course work? So you know: We've been lookingat different ways of doing that, but we've also been seeing some somefaculty decide like you know what I'm coming up with alternative assessments,because proctoring online proctoring and lockdown browsers and and webcamson my students and then having to upload various kinds of you, knowcredentials and assignments it's to anxiety producing for these students.You know they're already they're living through a pandemic they're livingthrough a recession. Do we really need to to put them through this just tojust to meet the goals of the course, so I think we're going to see a reallyinteresting discussion with a lot of you know: Corporate entities you know,refining their product and and trying to continue to have strongrelationships with universities, but I think also some push back both fromfaculty and Students Wo for those listening right now we just recorded awonderful episode on the future of online proctoring. If you scroll up oneepisode in your feed, you'll probably find it, but it's not live yetand. Igave you free advertise. Thank you. Thank you, Dr Cure, wonderful,wonderful stuff and we're so excited about what you've been building andwe're going to continue to look to you because you've proven again and againhow quickly and and with a high quality you guys are able to adapt. Finally,any next teps advice for institutions who are listening in they're looking toprovide the best hybrid learning experience possible. Where should theystart next, starting with Kathy there's? So many different considerations andyou know from a technical perspective- that's the easy part to be honest withyou that you know finding the right hardware to use, but I thinkestablishing the relationship that we have with Dr Kuren's organization tounderstand what the faculty and students are needing. That was pivotal.You know, I think if we hadn't already...

...had that relationship, this would havenot gone as well as it did so, I think, being partners and provibing thesupport that they needed. That's just you know, that's taught us a veryvaluable lesson and and information technology that we are a support to theinstitution and again that relationship with Dr Kurns group has just beeninvaluable in the success and Dr Current, I would agree with that. Ithink we love de partner with our our colleagues in it, and I think, if youhave the, if you're, if your focusis on you know how do we help our studentsmake it through this pandemic and create the richest possible learningenvironment for them than any kind of you know, there're, always sort ofterritorial issues on a campus like who's going to own. This particularcontractor who's going to represent us with this vendor. Where should thisunit, you know, be housed ther're, always those kinds of decisions, butthey all kind of fall into the background when you're thinking aboutyou know the future of higher education, the survival of our of our institutionsduring this, this really cataclysmic time that we're living through. So Ithink if we keep the focus on our students and supporting them and ourfaculty and supporting them that that you know that's really, everything elseshould should pale in comparison. I think you know recognizing. I think thecampuses will need to continue to recognize. You know that we are alllearning right. Teachers are seriously having to learn how to teach all overagain in new settings, and it doesn't mean that your values, your pedegogicalvalues, change it doesn't, but it might mean that the way you achieve those hasto change- and that's I think you know it's a learning curv for everybody andto I think it's really important to for campuses not to not to go about castingblame the faculty or working their...

...butts off. I have never seen as mucheffort on the part of the faculty to do high quality teaching in thirty yearsin higher education and the student support services are working so hard tosupport the the mental and physical wellbeing of our students and the othersupport services like itare working so hard. So I think it's really importantto to really support each other with a lot of grace and compassion, becausenobody's ever been through this before and I'll just add onto to Dr Curren'sstatements, I mean we have an incredible team at the top of ourinstitution with our president are provoced in our executive ICE Presidentfor Finance Administration. That really put students first and I think that'sthe message and our goals are to make sure that we serve our students andagain, like, like Dr Curren, said, it's just been incredible effort across allcross campus. Thank you both so much for your time today. What's the bestplace for listeners to connect with you if they have any followp questions,starting with Dr Karen, my email is Kurn, my last name, Katy RN at UK. WHY NOT EDU and Kathy my email address? Is Cathy Dothamperion Ham perIan at Uky Doddu awesome thanks Gevin to you both so much for joining ustoday, thanks for having Tis Har. Thank you so much Erik. We appreciate itattracting today's new post, traditional learners means adopting newenrolmant strategies. Keeliks educations data driven enterprise, wideapproach to enrollment growth is uniquely helping colleges anduniversities thrive in this new education, landscape and Helex has justpublished the second edition of their enrollment growth playbook, with fiftypercent brand new content on how institutions can solve today's mostpressing enromant growth challenges download it today for free at helocs,Educationcom playbook...

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