The 10 Must-Haves to Prevent Student Melt

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Miranda Benson, Vice President of Enrollment Management at Helix talks about our high risk for student melt this fall, and 10 ways to mitigate your risk through proven student engagement practices.

One of the obvious by products andrisks to all of what we are encountering right now is that students may goout and we have a high risk of student melt us all, you're listeningto enrollment growth university from Helix Education, the best professional development podcast for highereducation leaders looking to grow enrollment at their college or university. Whether you're lookingfor fresh enrollment growth techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come tothe right place. Let's get into the show. Hello and welcome to thelatest installment and Helix Educations Webinar series, covid nineteen, the Road Map tofall two thousand and twenty. Today the topic is online student experience and engagement, specifically how to reduce student Melt for fall in ten steps. Thanks everybodyfor joining. My name is Davids farkie mortimer. I'm the associate director ofcreative strategy at Helix Education. I'm going to be moderating the conversation today.Thanks again for joining. If this is your first time with us, welcome. If this is your fifth, ten fifteen time with us, yes,we've done fifteen at these webinars so far. Welcome back. We're glad to haveyou. Just a few housekeeping items to make you aware of whether thisis your first or fifteen time with us. We are recording today's Webinar. Itwill be posted on the Helix Education Youtube Channel later on. We're alsoutilizing a live transcript service called Otter Ai. We put the link in the chatif you'd like to take advantage of that resource. We also have aQA portion to our conversation today. At any time during the presentation today,you're hoping to click the Qaicon at the bottom of your screen and submit aquestion. We've already gotten some questions ahead of time, so thanks to thosewho submitted questions and we'll dig more into those when the time comes, butyou can ask it at any time throughout the events today. So again,this is our fifteen webinar. That is insane to think about, you know. As you can see, this is a journey that we've been on forquite some time now related to these four pillars of quality online education. willdig into those toward the end of today's time. Today, as I saidat the beginning, the focus is on online student experience and engagement, andI can think of no one more qualified or capable to talk about this topic. Then Miranda Benson, our vice president of enrollment management here at Helix.She's one of our most prolific web in our presenter. She's been in andabout a quarter of the Web Pars that we've done so far. Fourteen excitingyears in the highered space, serving non traditional students, helping them to achievequality online outcomes, as well as managing high performance teams. I've had theprivilege of working with her for the last five years that he looks gotten toknow her and her team really well and again, just the the way thatshe thinks, the attitude that she brings toward creative problem solving for her teamand for students. She's a great resource to have on our team and justa great person overall. I hope the I'm confident or personality will shine throughas she presents today. So if at Miranda, I'm going to turn thetime over you to get a started on the ten must taps to reduce studentmelt. Take it away, prolific. That was a great introduction. Thankyou so much, sparky, and thank you again everyone for welcome me meback for fifteen webinar with Kelix education. Right now most of us are operatingin this critical space and helping students tie up some of those loose ends ontheir application and completing their enrollment, as well as re entering continuing students backin after that. On top of all of that, navigating a pandemic andmanaging safety protocols by either either entering fall term completely online or with some prettysignificant changes to how we typically manage on campus. One of the obvious byproducts and risks to all of what we are encountering right now is that studentsmay bow out and we have a high risk of student melt. This fault. So the goal of today's Webinar is for you to walk away with tangibleaction items that you can implement quickly to enhance your university's ability to convert studentsdown your enrollment funnel and prevent melt.

Even if you confeasibly just implement acouple of the mustafs, it is bound to help you towards success. Soagain, retention strategy. Use a framework that starts with a foundation of aculture of coaching layered in with good technique and strategy. At this point,hopefully that a chance to attend our culture of coaching, Webinar and then ourretention in a pandemic Webbin are really focused around those foundations to help you improveyour enrollment and retention formats. Today we're going to briefly revisit the most uptodatesurvey data results to understand what the students are saying regarding their current experience,and then we're going to dive right into the ten must haves as we leadup to the fall enrollment and then, of course, you get asking whateverquestions you have and I will give you any additional insight that might be helpful. So again, what are our students saying? We Discuss Survey Results Backand culture coaching, but again, there have been a handful of student surveys. It was ranging for five hundred student participants to twenty five thousand student participants, and everyone is just trying to get an idea what students are planning todo for fall, what they need and how we're doing so far. Solet's quickly revisit what the students said. They said that their mental and emotionalhealth are suffering and it is impacting their academic progress. They've told us thatthey're struggling with time management, working possibly homeschooling their children and taking care ofother household responsibilities. They are still having a ton of concerns around finances andthey're questioning whether their online experience is actually worth this tuition build that they're paying. And, as we've talked about before, students who have less privileged identities,backgrounds and experiences are experiencing these stresses and worries about the Covid nineteen pandemiceven more acutely. Even prior to our huge global pandemic, these were thetop ten reasons for dropping. Data from community colleges about six thousand students inmultiple states found that working and paying for expenses where the top two challenges thatstudent said impeded their academic success. And then we also have the obstacles thatare specific to all of our population as a result of the pandemic. Weknow that the CDC data has shown that communities of color and putting black lack, you know, and the indigenous communities have a much higher rate of hospitalizationand even death as a result of covid nineteen. We know that students,some students, really truly desired the campus experience and they were okay with takingone or two online classes, but they did not envision being a completely onlinestudent. We know that our faculty and a lot of our courses are completelynew to online and we know that we're definitely in unchartered waters. The pandemictrends are continuing to show that their unpredictable and this is influencing all of ourlives and our students lives as they change from day today. And we knowthat those barriers that our students are facing our wildly impacting our universities and theplans to offer in person attendance. As at the beginning of June, sixtysix percent of universities plan to have in person attendance and we saw that dipabout seventeen percent over seven weeks. And many of the campuses that plan toopen are now only open for student leaders and athletes, and now we're ata point that only time will tell. I know at Iowa State two pointtwo percent of over where there there are three thousand students that were actually movedon campus tested positive in recent days, and that's just one sample of whatmay come in the days and weeks ahead. So now, considering all of thatsurvey data and the feedback and our risk areas. What should we implementand what can we do quickly before fall term? Our first must have leadinginto the big countdown for fall is creating a connection through your swags, sosweaters, t shirts, water bottles, laptop stickers. While many universities havehistorically provided some sort of swag to new freshman and transfer starting and fall,this is incredibly important this year as for...

...many students starting or restarting their collegejourney in two thousand and twenty might feel a little lackluster. So the goalwith sending swag to new students is to fold. One we want to getthe student excited, as they may be feeling a little bit disappointed about startingtheir journey in this way, and to we want the student to feel pridein being a part of your community and connecting them to your brand. Thisis an immediate investment to maintain connections from a distance. So some universities areusing swag giveaways as an incentive to register for some of their virtual events.Other universities are using celebration boxes with banners and branded big branded party favors andused to celebrate with their friends and family. And this is just a way tocreate a tangible connection and also have your students promoting your university. Sosome of the most current and relevant ideas that I've seen for swag include popsockets, masks, hand sanitizer, cell phone holder and cleaners. But don'thesitate to send tshirts and backpack. Students love those two, and also makesure that you capture photos of students in their swag and post those on socialmedia to really help excite your students and connect the community. Our must have. Number two is creating engaging and meaningful content. So a few minutes agowe talked about all of the feedback that students are providing about issues, concernsand why they ultimately drop or don't start classes, and this is where youshould start in determining what your content should be eared around. And it's reallytime to ramp off your strategy. It's really important to make sure that websitecontent for perspective students is as good as it can be. Considering many administratorsand student facing staff have really limited bandwidth, it's really important that your students caneasily navigate and retrieve what they need from your website. One good techniqueto do to improve your content is to set a goal for the amount oftime that you want students to spend on your site and then work backwards tobring storm content. It's really going to drive that result. Another must haveis a virtual one stop, and it's really as simple as it sounds,one place for all students to go to retrieve anything necessary relevant to fall involvement. By creating a virtual onestop, you simplify the work for your existing staff, improve some of your inefficient processes and get students information they need in amore time fashion. Your students can avoid traffic and long lines for some ofthose in demand services. Students will be better informed about deadlines. It shouldcause less frustration around bill payment or registering for classes, and happier students canthen focus more on the challenges that they actually signed up for, which isthe learning experience. But equally important to those two things is your social media. Your social media has to direct your students to the true content. Tothink of Facebook, instagram, snapchat as kind of that guy in the corner, usually with headphones and dancing and wielding the huge openhouse sign pointing you tothe home that they want you to see. So posting and sharing links to yourvirtual one stops on facebook and Instagram, is what is really going to drawstudents in and make sure that they utilize it. Some universities are havingstudents on campus post videos about the things that they're still enjoying on campus.Others are having students on we're attending virtually talk about what they miss on campus. And finally, don't forget to look at the comments for struggling and concernstudents and make sure that you're responding promptly. Next up must have number three.Involve your faculty. So getting the faculty involved recruiting and retention efforts it'sa very healthy thing, because then your faculty share ownership of it. Theirinvolvement can make a big difference in student retention. A student who gets toknow a faculty member may be more likely to want to study with that professorand can likely reinspire those students who made their commitment to ten months ago.Well, contact from your recruiters and advisors...

...are great. Faculty outreaches especially andimpactful because of their credibility and esteem with students, and this is a fantastictime to drive home some of that important information regarding the specific college or themajor information that may not have been absorbed in previous conversations. Faculty or CentralComponent to overall quality of institution and the experience of a perspective. Student researchhas shown that the quality of faculty as teachers and mentors is one of thetop five most important attributes and choosing a college for students and their parents,and we know that it takes time to build a meaningful relationship. So it'sa fantastic idea to get to hadd get your faculty to connect with students leadingup to the start versus waiting until the actual start of class. And Facultymembers can also help get students in the same program connected and help build thatcommunity. MUST have number four. Yes, you also want to get your seniorsand alumni involved, so it's a great idea to ask your current studentsand alumni to help with recruitment and retention efforts. Many times, college studentsand recent alumni are off the best recruiters because they're about the same age.There can be a better generational connection as compared to some of your faculty andstaff, and many universities are using student ambassadors to assist with their new studentorientation, presenting the certain topics or weighing with their own personal experience. Youcan also have them outreach to first time students during the start week, andyou should really use this approach informally, let your students speak for themselves ratherthan giving them pages of pages of talking points. If it's conversational and informal, it really creates a very relaxed environment for your students. Obviously, youwant to carefully select students to represent the department. That should be high caliber, motivated and enthusiastic students. You can also create some community here by highlightingstudent blogs on your EU or having current students post Hashtags to showcase pride andhighlight some of the best features of Your University. Run to must have numberfive. Of course, we have to get our parents in the mix.Two, so it's important to remember that in many cases, students are notthe only decisionmakers in this educational experience. We have to get our parents connectedas we approach fall, but we have to do this in a very different, very intentional way. One important consideration is making sure that your tailoring campusevents for parents of first generation students. These parents can really struggle to participatein their children's enrollment, as this is a completely novel experience for them,and by catering the content to these parents, you're making sure that everyone is gettingsome of those foundational pieces of information that are critical and supporting their student. The timing and location of certain events and orientation often don't accommodate families maybeunable to miss work or travel long distance, so make sure to schedule and orientationoption in the evening. It's also really important to keep parents in theloop. As students face a tougher labor market and rising student debt, parentsmay understandably feel a greater urge to ensure their children have a valuable college experience. It's a fine balance, though, because helicopter parenting can also really frustratestudents. So maybe creating and sending out a parent newsletters to highlight certain eventsand Info about information sessions to explain what parents can expect from their students.First Year of college must have number six. We have to figure out who isstruggling. So one of the best and biggest challenges that your university mightencounter this fall is just managing the sheer volume of student enrollment that you havestarting classes. Fall is typically our high point of the year and while thisis absolutely awesome, it does post challenges around finding some of our struggling studentsand getting resources to that metacritical time. Additionally, it can be really difficultto make sure that we are then following...

...up with those students with extra careand contact to make sure they don't slip back into that trouble zone. Soit's really important that you have way to identify your students going in a fallthat might need extra support. You can start with first generation students, studentswho are admitted on probation, and set in your process extra points of contactand engagement with them, in addition to a text and email cadence. Thatreally showcases your resources. Also, a strategy that I personally love is reachingout to all of your projected starts and registered students with a text strategy.So typically we will give students three options to respond with. Text to oneif you are all set with your classes and do not have additional questions andconcerns, text to two if you have questions, and text at three ifyou have questions and concerns. This allows us to get to our twos andthrees very quickly with a phone call, usually within about ten minutes, andyou can also ask the students if they would like to schedule a time tocall back with the text strategy, just to make sure that you actually connectwith the student. Lastly, it's a really good idea that you have someway to continue to flag or identify these students within your team crm, sothat contact and support of your apt risk students is not just the one timebig that you're continuing to follow up and nurture for a continued period of timeuntil that risk is no longer present. Must have number seven. We haveto provide optimal virtual service. I think it's fair to say that this yearhas been an adjustment for every one, and academic adjustment for students and aprofessional adjustment for those of us who work for students, and including learning towork remotely in some cases. We are still evolving in our approach to virtualservice, but I think it's everyone's desire to provide fantastic student service this yearand while safety is a priority, it doesn't mean that we have to acceptsome PR service and, ordinary times, spacetoface conversations with admissions and financial aidcounselors are key to building engagement with prospective students and now we are translating thatexperience into virtual events. As Students Register for those virtual events, there's anopportunity to collect information and insight for them. One potential idea is to dig intothe student experience and ask about their top worry about going to college,as some of these events, and then coaches and advisors can then follow upwith students to schedule a conversation and talk through those concerns. One idea isto make one on one appointments available with frequently contacted departments so students can stillget facetofacea by zoom or means or whatever you do. Sometimes you can usecertain scheduling programs, so we use schedule one and that allow students to seeavailability online and also get reminders for those appointments. And some universities me arebeing very creative with their virtual service. So I've seen virtual events included thecoffee chats, but sometimes it's Scavenger Hans and guide and Meditation and Yogas.You really have the chance to be creative with what you offer. Students musthave number eight. We have to be guardians of the student experience. Soone of the components of the student experience that I tend to mention and everyone of these webinars is just that. As leaders, we have to beguardians of this experience. It's necessary to share our expectations with staff members tovigorously train around these areas, but it is equally necessary to inspect what weexact. It's important to have a culture around student service. Customer Service didn'tused to be a term that you would hear when referring to higher education.However, more and more institutions are beginning to look at students and parents ascustomers, with the goal of providing a level of service that students and parentswould expect to see in other industries like...

...retail or hospitality. In order toimprove the quality of service for an entire institution, Hall, Faculty and StaffNeed to be bought in. This shift in mindset often has to start withleadership, but it needs to carry through to frontline staff, as they arethe ones providing the daily service to our customers. So consider launching a customerservice program that will work to get everyone bought in. But one idea toquickly implement for fall is manager welcome calls, where a man Wi your gives callsto certain students to identify their experience with the department. Another area tobe particularly vigilant around is response time, so students and parents are used toimmediate responses. In today's age, universities are being compared to retailers like Amazon, and students and parents can become impatient feel like their needs aren't being metwhen they have to wait in law lines or be put on hold for answersto important questions. One consideration would be using chat or an interactive Qa serviceas you drive to fall. You can even use Google analytics to show youthe most frequently ask question on your website. To help you with developing some ofthat content, and of course you need ongoing training, but you alsoneed to make sure that you have measurements tied to the experience that you expectfrom your staff, and usually this is making sure that you have performance goalsfront and center, such as your enrollment and retention goals for the term,but also things that measure the student experience, goals that provide both the qualitative andquantitative feedback, such as your MPs. Four, must have number nine.We have to have a gold standard orientation experience while online advising and virtualstudent meetings are new for many universities, online orientation doesn't have to sell theend of community building. This generation of student spends more time than any previousgeneration has on their screen and much of it is connecting digitally with friends andpeers and checked. In many cases we're just catching up to our students.So on our website we have an entire online orientation shell which we can walkyou through all of the important content to consider in your orientation and preparing students. Also, there's a ton of ways to be created with your orientation andwith consideration to our technically savvy generation of students. Some institutions are using interactiveinstagram stories and Instagram facebook live. There are also some of them are alsospreading orientation modules across several weeks to pace engagement and then supplementing that with virtualacademic advising sessions. And last up, must have number ten. We needto get voice to voice with students during the start week. So we knowthat researchers have found a strong, positive correlation between building relationships with students andacademic achievement. One idea is to have faculty members invite each student to meetwith them virtually for a ten minute me and great meeting. Of course,academic advisors should definitely be tech doing at temp. Check with students to makesure that they've been able to get into class, ask about any issues,ask about first impressions to students really feel supported by reaching out, the facultyadvisors are saying I care about you first and form botes, and I wantyou to be successful in this class and this is incredibly important and to developingthe maintenance plan for students as a semester goes on. And now you getto ask me questions and I'll turn my light back on. There you go, Branda, thanks so much for those ten much tabs. And Yeah,we're ready for the QA portion now, and so if you join us alittle bit like that's totally fine. There's a q and I kind of thebottom of your screen where you can as submit questions on anything that you sareheard. We've already got some questions in the happer. So, Miranda,I hope you're ready. Ready. All right. So we had a questioncome in before the Webinar from Jim.

Jim Asked how do you suggest teachersmight be trained more thoroughly in the use of online education. I know thatsomething that your friend and mine, Chiron Happas are chief academic officer, wouldreally dig into. But you mentioned getting faculty involved in this process, andso anything else that you can think of related to faculty training and getting theminvolved in in these types of things. Yeah, I know she'R on doessuch a great time in this area. At the one thing that I canthink of is as much as you can help see things from a different perspective, right. That's what sometimes sometimes a little tricky for faculty and teachers,is that you're coming in with your experience and your role and looking at thecurriculum or looking at the online tools that you're using. But as much asyou can get feedback or start to shift your mindset to approach this as alearner, I think the better you are are about navigating that particular program somaybe writing yourself down some questions and saying, if I was a student, whatwould I ask? What would be my main points of concern when Iwas a student? And if that's really hard for you to do because you'vebeen in faculty or you've been a teacher for a really long time, thenmaybe asking an actual student to help give you some beedback about what the topareas are that they want to drive home or they want to understand in someparticular content and then looking and seeing what they experience is from their angle,and usually that can help us as educational providers to make sure that their experienceis good. But sometimes it's hard when you've been in a certain area ina certain role to see it from that to have that paradigm chest. Allright, gring in. So I thanks, Miranda. I'm seeing a question fromtrevor. Trevor Rights. I work with a unique college access success programwhere we don't have a lot of interaction with incoming students until they graduate highschool. What are some ideas to best connect with these students going forward andduring covid will you have to say to trevor, Miranda, I would justsay so it sounds like trevor is saying that there's not too much contact withthose students until they actually graduate from school, and so they're quickly. It soundslike they are quickly trying to build a relationship with these students prior tothem getting started in classes. Is that way her starting? That's how I'mreading it? Yeah, okay, okay. So what I would say is obviouslycontact. I'm a huge fan of having conversations. I'm a huge fanof making sure that it's not in this virtual kind of world. It's notjust over the phone, but using zoom or Google meets and seeing that facetoface. And what I was strongly suggest is having this broken out over a periodof time and using the first session just truly as I get to know yetand having that information of personal connection kind of flow back and forth. SoI just think that that's very critical to building the trust and to really connectingthe student to the person and that person representing the university, and I thinkoftentimes we have this tendency to just jump right into business and I think forour students, what they truly love about their college experience is being able toget that connection and feel like their university is a community. So I wouldsay that as much as you can having weakly contact with those students leading upto when they start classes and making sure to insert some levels of just personalchat and not just all business, if you have the bandwidth to do that. I think that's a great way to build a relationship. All Right,trevor put thank you in the chat. So glad I was helpful. Freedriver. Appreciate it. Shee. A question from Luis. Luis asks RESA'sI really like the idea of a newsletter for parents. Any examples for theCommunity College Realm? What would you say...

...to that, Miranda? Any examples? So I think the big piece of this is your newsletter can be anythingthat you want it to be, and I would say that there are somegreat newsletters that also by a four year universities. But the big piece ofthis is your content, and what we know to be true about community collegesis there is a level of different needs and concerns of those students versus studentsthat are attending, that are attending the for a year and not just becauseof it, you know, being in the first two years. They're justthey can. Those demographics tend to need different things. So what I wouldsay is back in retention in a pandemic, we talked about really having a roundtable and getting together and identifying what the needs of your specific population foryour university is, and I think that that's a great idea to start with, and then making sure that you just all of your content in the newsletteror whatever you're choosing to send out to students is geared towards what the studentsare already telling you that they need to know about. I would say fromthe parent newsletter, I would just say parents typically want to know what isgoing to come out of all of this, right where their dollars are going,and so any in formation that you can give about the labor market,any information that you can provide in the parent newsletter about ways that students areusing their degrees in their current space and with job opportunities and or what theycan do later on. Highlighting students storises particularly impactful with parents. But thoseare some examples that I can think of how you can really connect parents.Whereas maybe a newsletter to a student might be around the activities or the thingsthat they really enjoy doing, parents real pendant wants to focus on outcome.All right, you know, thanks for the question. Louis. Seeing aquestion come in from with Sam. With hom says. I'm from Beirut,Lebanon, and I work as a director of a newly established pretension unit.With the blast that happen in they rude the ongoing bad economic crisis and withcovid nineteen were expecting a high number of dropouts in the coming year. Isthere any reference or website I can check to try to save our situation?And obviously our hearts and our thoughts go up to Lebanon and Bey route specificallywith the tragedy that happened, and you know we talked about this in thecontext to covid nineteen, but these are principles that can be useful in anytype of situation. Doesn't have to be a pandemic. There are lots ofways that students can be impacted in and that thought of, you know,being hesitant to move forward can be impacted by lots of different things, notjust not just an illness, and so I know we'll talk about the resourcesthat we helix have have collected and have curated that are available to folks.But, Miranda, anything else, any other encouragement that you would send toto we says, which again our hearts, thoughts and prayers go out to Lebanonand and I would just say that the only thing that I can imaginethat would be so critical and important right now for those students is just asmuch resource that you can make available and communicate and whatever way that is bestto communicate right now. I would say that that is the best thing todo right and we do. We will go through the website and all ofthe resources to see how we can help, but I would say that the bigfocus and any kind of emergency situation is how can we support and provideresources to our impacted students. It's great and all the best to to youand yours. We saw on in in Lebanon in this kind of Siguaes intointo the next question that I want to bring up. Miranda. You talkedat the top about mental and emotional health being a significant factor for students asthey make their decision, and so just any other insight that you have interms of how these ten tips can help...

...boost students mental and emotional wellbeing,just any other angles you can take on that. Yeah, I mean Ineed to overt simple by this, but the big key is that the majorfocuses and all of the student experience and engagement webinars that we've done so faris really making it a point to leverage technology when needed, but as muchas possible to get voice to voice and connection with as many students as youcan, as often as you can, and the big piece is that one. We know that contact in that support is bound to help students in theirmental health and in moments that they're struggling. But in addition to that, italso works as an intervention because you're likely to maybe catch some of thosestudents who are on the verge of a breakdown, are really really struggling,and point them to any resources that you can offer as a university or justgeneral, general resources. And so the hard part sometimes about inserting technology isthat we lose that chance to to really help students and in kind of getup aulse and a check on them, at tempt check on them, andso I would say that while technology is fantastic and we certainly need times tomake sure that it works hand in hand with voice to voice and with personalconnection with faculty, Advisors and all of your staff, it's great. Thanksfor that, Miranda, and obviously you know you're talking about communicating to asmany students as possible. You made a point to help prioritize those conversations byidentifying and helping those students who are struggling, and so the question that I wouldhave is kind of how much is too much? You know, weworried about maybe smothering or helicoptering these students too much or maybe unintentionally driving themaway or increasing their their disinterest, and so what would you say to thosewho have those concerns? Yeah, I mean, I think it is avery real concern. I will say that I would say that ultimately your studentsare doing great. I've never heard of or seen in my career at timewhere I could say rollment performance are our retention performance was impacted or negatively impactedas a result of students feeling smothered. So that is the good news thatultimately I don't think that it is a significant factor that's really really going tohurt you if you go overboard, whereas we know, on the other hand, if you don't do enough to contact and engage your students, that theydon't feel a connection, if they are not feeling the care and support,they absolutely will leave. There's much less risk. There's less risk in goingoverboard than there is doing too little. But I would say that an importantpiece of that is making sure that you are identifying cools of students who arelikely to have risk so that might be your new admissions coming in, butit also can be using that one, two, three text strategy and makingsure that those particular students are then flag or additional support and resources within yourcontact strategy, and then that way you're not overwhelming your students who generally don'tneed it or like it, but you are getting to the ones that haveraised their hand and said I'm struggling in those early moments. That's great,Branda. Thank you. We've got time for a few more questions, soif you haven't already, please use that Qa function there to send us aquestion, and thanks again to all those who have already has submitted questions.Let's stay on this topic of Student Parent Communication. You talked about, youknow, response time, in the importance of response time. Any more specificsyou have on an ideal response time and how much does it vary depending onthe type of channel that's being used? Yeah, so what I would sayas a general rule is if you can get back to students and parents withinthe same day and of the call, that is ideal. Twenty four hoursis kind of D Max and I would...

...say it's an interesting thing to someextent. That's that's kind of happening in our current environment where I don't knowabout you all, book but when I leave a voicemail anywhere now, it'skind of in the back of my head almost to assume now that I'm notgoing to get a call back, and I know that's that's actually pretty terrible. But I would say that that we should surprise students with how quickly theyget a response. Right. That is kind of what we're shooting for,is this seems like, oh my gosh, this is crazy, how fast Igot to reply, and also being consistent with that right so one ofthe things that your student or your parent can look back and say as wow, they get back right away, and also knowing that maybe the one timea message or something slips through the cracks, that that is so unlike the university, because they always get back to me. So I think starting withthat goal, in that vision and mind is really, really a great wayto not necessarily focus on how long do you want to wait before it becomeskind of like the red line in the sand, until students and parents whenthey should receive a response, but how quickly? How can we create anenvironment where our staff members are really motivated and sire to get back to parentsand students really quickly, but I would say no more than twenty four hours, and I think that that does not matter what channel, but I wouldmake sure that you get back to them with sure. Okay, awesome,pis random. Looks like Trevor has a follow up pieces. I work fora CBIO and our own website isn't that strong with content. What are someof the most important things to have on there to make sure students can useit as a central hub and spend more time utilizing the resources who I wouldsay that the most important thing that you can put on your website are theprocesses that you normally expect students to go through to be able to get androlled or to register for classes. So it all kind of depends on whatyour website looks like or how user friendly your processes are. But is thatreally if you don't have a lot of bandwidth and your processes are pretty cumbersome? I would definitely lay out some expectations and a process guide that students canuse a step by step way that if a student wanted to get completely enrolledinto the university with minimal help from everyone and including timelines for how long certainthings may take, that you would have that available and have access to that. I would obviously have an academic calendar. I would create a Faq so thatstudents, whatever your frequent questions are, make sure that you're utilizing ones thatare true to your student base. But I would say that those aresome of the things that, from an enrollment operation standpoint, would be reallycritical and important if your goal is to have students really navigating from that website. Obviously, program plans classes that they need to complete some way for themto see, you know, what they have checked off, a degree auditof sort. So those are some of the things that, if you havequick and easy links to, are pretty critical. Okay, awesome, thanks, Brandon. Thanks Trevor, for for the question. Branda. Let's talktwagbags. Those one of the first must haves. It that you talked about. You talked about creating that physical and tangible connection with students through that swag. I'm curious if if digital swam I could also have an impact. Youknow, things like snap chat filters, zoom backgrounds, especially students are taking, you know, beginning this journey online. What impact could digital swag have ontheir ability to showcase that school pride. Yeah, I love it. Imean I certainly love it. Now. This is what I will say independing on what your university environment is...

...right now, whether you're having inperson or whether you're completely online. I know that ferries across the country,but I would say to some extent maybe there's potential for our students right nowto have a little bit of virtual overload. I mean they were already doing itto some extent socially and personally. Now they might be working virtually nowthey also might be attending virtually. I think there is something to be saidfor students perceiving something in the mail that they can touch and that they knowthat one day, when kind of our world returns to normal, they canwear. So I would say just depending on your area and depending on whatyour current setup is with attendance. The second to make here I would sayyou might want to hold back any additional virtual things or limited if your studentsmight be getting a little bit overloaded by it. All right, all goodthings. I don't think I see any more questions in the qua or thechat, and so thanks to everybody who submitted question. For Your tennis beforewe go really quick, we just want to again share the resources that HelixEducation has made available to a just to you, in this online transition.As we thought about it, we've casted them within these four pillars of qualityonline education. We handed at them at the beginning and so here they arekind of in all their majesty. Today's pillar that we focused on was onlinestudent experience and engagement, but as we think about this transition, there's alot more to that. We talked about student and parent expectation management. Ithink we touched on that in a few of these must have just in termsof making sure that there's clear and concise expectations for students and their parents intowhat this new normal is going to look like. We also talk about thingsat the level of institutional online readiness. How can your entire institution organization betterprepare themselves for the unique challenges and opportunities that are present by being a primarilyonline instruction institution at this time? And speaking of teaching and learning, that'sthe last pillar that we have, the online teaching and learning experience. Howdo we continue to achieve great outcomes for our students when we're doing this teachingprimarily, how can faculty continue in their mission of communicating their expectations and theirexpertise in their curriculum to students in that setting? And so how Helix Educationcan help across these pillars is we have been delivering quality online outcomes for studentsfor the past few decades now, and so we see this as transitioning toonline quality education from emergency remote teaching. When when the pandemic really first hit, that first wave there in March, we had a moment's notice essentially,and hire it to to try to transition online and to keep everybody safe.And so, as we adapt and we transition to fault two thousand and twentyand beyond, that emergency remote learning isn't going to be quite enough to satisfythe needs of students, of parents, of a creditors of the Department ofEducation and other folks. And so we need to ensure that this student experienceremains highly intentional and remains emblematic of what you would want to offer as yourinstitution, how you want your introduction to be identified, whether courses are takenon campus or online. And again it's about building that confidence, building theknowledge base of your students and your staff as well. And so to thatand Helix has assembled guides, rubricks, templates, many other resources revolving aroundthose four pillars to help you accelerate your transition to online and continue to driveexceptional online students, the kind of quality of the students, parents, accreditorsand others expect. And so again, their highlight around these these four pillarsintroduction, online readiness, the online teaching and learning experience, online student experienceand engagement and student and parent expectation management. And you can find out more aboutthe pillars themselves on our website, as well as, once again,all the different types of resources that are available assessment, row bricks, howto guides, professional development and training,...

...including these webin artist, as wellas podcasts that we've done around these topics. We've also got, as Moraniment,we got some foundational templates and benchmarking KPI documents, things that you candownload and fill out for your institution to assess kind of where you are andhow you can improve in each of these areas. And so the moment you'vebeen waiting for. Where can you find all these things? So I'm goingto post these in the chat as well, and so you can go to HelixEducationcom, new future. That's our website. We can access all ofthese resources that we've talked about, these different categories, as well as learnmore about the different pillars of a quality online education and how we can assistyou in those ways. We'd also love to delve more into your specific situationto see how we can help, and you can get that ball rolling bysending us an email at new future info at Helix Educationcom. That email willgo to handful of us and we'll connect you with the right people who canhelp you dig more deeply into your situation and how Helix Education can help.And again, besides the different resources that are available there, we've got willhave this Webinarn't there, as well as pass webinars that we've done, podcastloads of things there to help you all along the way. We're going tobe continuing this webinar series as well as long as we've got we've got aninterest and I think that interest remains, and so be on the lookout forinvitations to additional webinars as we've dive into topics related in to these four pillarsof quality online education. So one last time, we're going to post ourwebsite right there, Helix Educationcom. New Future and are email address. NewFuture Info at Helix Educationcom. And again, those are in the chat if youlike to copy and paste out of there. Miranda, thank you somuch for your time and for your expertise and for your answers. It wasgreat to hear from you. Thanks to all of our attendees. Thank youfor the privilege of your time. We really appreciate you spending it with us. Please stay safe, have a great rest of your day and week andwe look forward to interacting with you more in the future. Take care,everybody. Thank you everyone. Attracting today's new post traditional learners means adopting newenrollment strategies. Helix educations data driven, enterprize wide approach to enrollment growth isuniquely helping colleges and universities thrive in this new education landscape, and Helix hasjust published the second edition of their enrollment growth playbook with fifty percent brand newcontent on how institutions can solve today's most pressing enrollment growth challenges, downloaded todayfor free at Helix Educationcom. Playbook. You've been listening to enrollment growth universityfrom Helix Education. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe tothe show and Itunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much forlistening. Until next time,.

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