The 10 Must-Haves to Prevent Student Melt

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Miranda Benson, Vice President of Enrollment Management at Helix talks about our high risk for student melt this fall, and 10 ways to mitigate your risk through proven student engagement practices.

One of the obvious by products and risks to all of what we are encountering right now is that students may go out and we have a high risk of student melt us all, you're listening to enrollment growth university from Helix Education, the best professional development podcast for higher education leaders looking to grow enrollment at their college or university. Whether you're looking for fresh enrollment growth techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. Let's get into the show. Hello and welcome to the latest installment and Helix Educations Webinar series, covid nineteen, the Road Map to fall two thousand and twenty. Today the topic is online student experience and engagement, specifically how to reduce student Melt for fall in ten steps. Thanks everybody for joining. My name is Davids farkie mortimer. I'm the associate director of creative strategy at Helix Education. I'm going to be moderating the conversation today. Thanks again for joining. If this is your first time with us, welcome. If this is your fifth, ten fifteen time with us, yes, we've done fifteen at these webinars so far. Welcome back. We're glad to have you. Just a few housekeeping items to make you aware of whether this is your first or fifteen time with us. We are recording today's Webinar. It will be posted on the Helix Education Youtube Channel later on. We're also utilizing a live transcript service called Otter Ai. We put the link in the chat if you'd like to take advantage of that resource. We also have a QA portion to our conversation today. At any time during the presentation today, you're hoping to click the Qaicon at the bottom of your screen and submit a question. We've already gotten some questions ahead of time, so thanks to those who submitted questions and we'll dig more into those when the time comes, but you can ask it at any time throughout the events today. So again, this is our fifteen webinar. That is insane to think about, you know. As you can see, this is a journey that we've been on for quite some time now related to these four pillars of quality online education. will dig into those toward the end of today's time. Today, as I said at the beginning, the focus is on online student experience and engagement, and I can think of no one more qualified or capable to talk about this topic. Then Miranda Benson, our vice president of enrollment management here at Helix. She's one of our most prolific web in our presenter. She's been in and about a quarter of the Web Pars that we've done so far. Fourteen exciting years in the highered space, serving non traditional students, helping them to achieve quality online outcomes, as well as managing high performance teams. I've had the privilege of working with her for the last five years that he looks gotten to know her and her team really well and again, just the the way that she thinks, the attitude that she brings toward creative problem solving for her team and for students. She's a great resource to have on our team and just a great person overall. I hope the I'm confident or personality will shine through as she presents today. So if at Miranda, I'm going to turn the time over you to get a started on the ten must taps to reduce student melt. Take it away, prolific. That was a great introduction. Thank you so much, sparky, and thank you again everyone for welcome me me back for fifteen webinar with Kelix education. Right now most of us are operating in this critical space and helping students tie up some of those loose ends on their application and completing their enrollment, as well as re entering continuing students back in after that. On top of all of that, navigating a pandemic and managing safety protocols by either either entering fall term completely online or with some pretty significant changes to how we typically manage on campus. One of the obvious by products and risks to all of what we are encountering right now is that students may bow out and we have a high risk of student melt. This fault. So the goal of today's Webinar is for you to walk away with tangible action items that you can implement quickly to enhance your university's ability to convert students down your enrollment funnel and prevent melt.

Even if you confeasibly just implement a couple of the mustafs, it is bound to help you towards success. So again, retention strategy. Use a framework that starts with a foundation of a culture of coaching layered in with good technique and strategy. At this point, hopefully that a chance to attend our culture of coaching, Webinar and then our retention in a pandemic Webbin are really focused around those foundations to help you improve your enrollment and retention formats. Today we're going to briefly revisit the most uptodate survey data results to understand what the students are saying regarding their current experience, and then we're going to dive right into the ten must haves as we lead up to the fall enrollment and then, of course, you get asking whatever questions you have and I will give you any additional insight that might be helpful. So again, what are our students saying? We Discuss Survey Results Back and culture coaching, but again, there have been a handful of student surveys. It was ranging for five hundred student participants to twenty five thousand student participants, and everyone is just trying to get an idea what students are planning to do for fall, what they need and how we're doing so far. So let's quickly revisit what the students said. They said that their mental and emotional health are suffering and it is impacting their academic progress. They've told us that they're struggling with time management, working possibly homeschooling their children and taking care of other household responsibilities. They are still having a ton of concerns around finances and they're questioning whether their online experience is actually worth this tuition build that they're paying. And, as we've talked about before, students who have less privileged identities, backgrounds and experiences are experiencing these stresses and worries about the Covid nineteen pandemic even more acutely. Even prior to our huge global pandemic, these were the top ten reasons for dropping. Data from community colleges about six thousand students in multiple states found that working and paying for expenses where the top two challenges that student said impeded their academic success. And then we also have the obstacles that are specific to all of our population as a result of the pandemic. We know that the CDC data has shown that communities of color and putting black lack, you know, and the indigenous communities have a much higher rate of hospitalization and even death as a result of covid nineteen. We know that students, some students, really truly desired the campus experience and they were okay with taking one or two online classes, but they did not envision being a completely online student. We know that our faculty and a lot of our courses are completely new to online and we know that we're definitely in unchartered waters. The pandemic trends are continuing to show that their unpredictable and this is influencing all of our lives and our students lives as they change from day today. And we know that those barriers that our students are facing our wildly impacting our universities and the plans to offer in person attendance. As at the beginning of June, sixty six percent of universities plan to have in person attendance and we saw that dip about seventeen percent over seven weeks. And many of the campuses that plan to open are now only open for student leaders and athletes, and now we're at a point that only time will tell. I know at Iowa State two point two percent of over where there there are three thousand students that were actually moved on campus tested positive in recent days, and that's just one sample of what may come in the days and weeks ahead. So now, considering all of that survey data and the feedback and our risk areas. What should we implement and what can we do quickly before fall term? Our first must have leading into the big countdown for fall is creating a connection through your swags, so sweaters, t shirts, water bottles, laptop stickers. While many universities have historically provided some sort of swag to new freshman and transfer starting and fall, this is incredibly important this year as for...

...many students starting or restarting their college journey in two thousand and twenty might feel a little lackluster. So the goal with sending swag to new students is to fold. One we want to get the student excited, as they may be feeling a little bit disappointed about starting their journey in this way, and to we want the student to feel pride in being a part of your community and connecting them to your brand. This is an immediate investment to maintain connections from a distance. So some universities are using swag giveaways as an incentive to register for some of their virtual events. Other universities are using celebration boxes with banners and branded big branded party favors and used to celebrate with their friends and family. And this is just a way to create a tangible connection and also have your students promoting your university. So some of the most current and relevant ideas that I've seen for swag include pop sockets, masks, hand sanitizer, cell phone holder and cleaners. But don't hesitate to send tshirts and backpack. Students love those two, and also make sure that you capture photos of students in their swag and post those on social media to really help excite your students and connect the community. Our must have. Number two is creating engaging and meaningful content. So a few minutes ago we talked about all of the feedback that students are providing about issues, concerns and why they ultimately drop or don't start classes, and this is where you should start in determining what your content should be eared around. And it's really time to ramp off your strategy. It's really important to make sure that website content for perspective students is as good as it can be. Considering many administrators and student facing staff have really limited bandwidth, it's really important that your students can easily navigate and retrieve what they need from your website. One good technique to do to improve your content is to set a goal for the amount of time that you want students to spend on your site and then work backwards to bring storm content. It's really going to drive that result. Another must have is a virtual one stop, and it's really as simple as it sounds, one place for all students to go to retrieve anything necessary relevant to fall involvement. By creating a virtual onestop, you simplify the work for your existing staff, improve some of your inefficient processes and get students information they need in a more time fashion. Your students can avoid traffic and long lines for some of those in demand services. Students will be better informed about deadlines. It should cause less frustration around bill payment or registering for classes, and happier students can then focus more on the challenges that they actually signed up for, which is the learning experience. But equally important to those two things is your social media. Your social media has to direct your students to the true content. To think of Facebook, instagram, snapchat as kind of that guy in the corner, usually with headphones and dancing and wielding the huge openhouse sign pointing you to the home that they want you to see. So posting and sharing links to your virtual one stops on facebook and Instagram, is what is really going to draw students in and make sure that they utilize it. Some universities are having students on campus post videos about the things that they're still enjoying on campus. Others are having students on we're attending virtually talk about what they miss on campus. And finally, don't forget to look at the comments for struggling and concern students and make sure that you're responding promptly. Next up must have number three. Involve your faculty. So getting the faculty involved recruiting and retention efforts it's a very healthy thing, because then your faculty share ownership of it. Their involvement can make a big difference in student retention. A student who gets to know a faculty member may be more likely to want to study with that professor and can likely reinspire those students who made their commitment to ten months ago. Well, contact from your recruiters and advisors...

...are great. Faculty outreaches especially and impactful because of their credibility and esteem with students, and this is a fantastic time to drive home some of that important information regarding the specific college or the major information that may not have been absorbed in previous conversations. Faculty or Central Component to overall quality of institution and the experience of a perspective. Student research has shown that the quality of faculty as teachers and mentors is one of the top five most important attributes and choosing a college for students and their parents, and we know that it takes time to build a meaningful relationship. So it's a fantastic idea to get to hadd get your faculty to connect with students leading up to the start versus waiting until the actual start of class. And Faculty members can also help get students in the same program connected and help build that community. MUST have number four. Yes, you also want to get your seniors and alumni involved, so it's a great idea to ask your current students and alumni to help with recruitment and retention efforts. Many times, college students and recent alumni are off the best recruiters because they're about the same age. There can be a better generational connection as compared to some of your faculty and staff, and many universities are using student ambassadors to assist with their new student orientation, presenting the certain topics or weighing with their own personal experience. You can also have them outreach to first time students during the start week, and you should really use this approach informally, let your students speak for themselves rather than giving them pages of pages of talking points. If it's conversational and informal, it really creates a very relaxed environment for your students. Obviously, you want to carefully select students to represent the department. That should be high caliber, motivated and enthusiastic students. You can also create some community here by highlighting student blogs on your EU or having current students post Hashtags to showcase pride and highlight some of the best features of Your University. Run to must have number five. Of course, we have to get our parents in the mix. Two, so it's important to remember that in many cases, students are not the only decisionmakers in this educational experience. We have to get our parents connected as we approach fall, but we have to do this in a very different, very intentional way. One important consideration is making sure that your tailoring campus events for parents of first generation students. These parents can really struggle to participate in their children's enrollment, as this is a completely novel experience for them, and by catering the content to these parents, you're making sure that everyone is getting some of those foundational pieces of information that are critical and supporting their student. The timing and location of certain events and orientation often don't accommodate families maybe unable to miss work or travel long distance, so make sure to schedule and orientation option in the evening. It's also really important to keep parents in the loop. As students face a tougher labor market and rising student debt, parents may understandably feel a greater urge to ensure their children have a valuable college experience. It's a fine balance, though, because helicopter parenting can also really frustrate students. So maybe creating and sending out a parent newsletters to highlight certain events and Info about information sessions to explain what parents can expect from their students. First Year of college must have number six. We have to figure out who is struggling. So one of the best and biggest challenges that your university might encounter this fall is just managing the sheer volume of student enrollment that you have starting classes. Fall is typically our high point of the year and while this is absolutely awesome, it does post challenges around finding some of our struggling students and getting resources to that metacritical time. Additionally, it can be really difficult to make sure that we are then following...

...up with those students with extra care and contact to make sure they don't slip back into that trouble zone. So it's really important that you have way to identify your students going in a fall that might need extra support. You can start with first generation students, students who are admitted on probation, and set in your process extra points of contact and engagement with them, in addition to a text and email cadence. That really showcases your resources. Also, a strategy that I personally love is reaching out to all of your projected starts and registered students with a text strategy. So typically we will give students three options to respond with. Text to one if you are all set with your classes and do not have additional questions and concerns, text to two if you have questions, and text at three if you have questions and concerns. This allows us to get to our twos and threes very quickly with a phone call, usually within about ten minutes, and you can also ask the students if they would like to schedule a time to call back with the text strategy, just to make sure that you actually connect with the student. Lastly, it's a really good idea that you have some way to continue to flag or identify these students within your team crm, so that contact and support of your apt risk students is not just the one time big that you're continuing to follow up and nurture for a continued period of time until that risk is no longer present. Must have number seven. We have to provide optimal virtual service. I think it's fair to say that this year has been an adjustment for every one, and academic adjustment for students and a professional adjustment for those of us who work for students, and including learning to work remotely in some cases. We are still evolving in our approach to virtual service, but I think it's everyone's desire to provide fantastic student service this year and while safety is a priority, it doesn't mean that we have to accept some PR service and, ordinary times, spacetoface conversations with admissions and financial aid counselors are key to building engagement with prospective students and now we are translating that experience into virtual events. As Students Register for those virtual events, there's an opportunity to collect information and insight for them. One potential idea is to dig into the student experience and ask about their top worry about going to college, as some of these events, and then coaches and advisors can then follow up with students to schedule a conversation and talk through those concerns. One idea is to make one on one appointments available with frequently contacted departments so students can still get facetofacea by zoom or means or whatever you do. Sometimes you can use certain scheduling programs, so we use schedule one and that allow students to see availability online and also get reminders for those appointments. And some universities me are being very creative with their virtual service. So I've seen virtual events included the coffee chats, but sometimes it's Scavenger Hans and guide and Meditation and Yogas. You really have the chance to be creative with what you offer. Students must have number eight. We have to be guardians of the student experience. So one of the components of the student experience that I tend to mention and every one of these webinars is just that. As leaders, we have to be guardians of this experience. It's necessary to share our expectations with staff members to vigorously train around these areas, but it is equally necessary to inspect what we exact. It's important to have a culture around student service. Customer Service didn't used to be a term that you would hear when referring to higher education. However, more and more institutions are beginning to look at students and parents as customers, with the goal of providing a level of service that students and parents would expect to see in other industries like...

...retail or hospitality. In order to improve the quality of service for an entire institution, Hall, Faculty and Staff Need to be bought in. This shift in mindset often has to start with leadership, but it needs to carry through to frontline staff, as they are the ones providing the daily service to our customers. So consider launching a customer service program that will work to get everyone bought in. But one idea to quickly implement for fall is manager welcome calls, where a man Wi your gives calls to certain students to identify their experience with the department. Another area to be particularly vigilant around is response time, so students and parents are used to immediate responses. In today's age, universities are being compared to retailers like Amazon, and students and parents can become impatient feel like their needs aren't being met when they have to wait in law lines or be put on hold for answers to important questions. One consideration would be using chat or an interactive Qa service as you drive to fall. You can even use Google analytics to show you the most frequently ask question on your website. To help you with developing some of that content, and of course you need ongoing training, but you also need to make sure that you have measurements tied to the experience that you expect from your staff, and usually this is making sure that you have performance goals front and center, such as your enrollment and retention goals for the term, but also things that measure the student experience, goals that provide both the qualitative and quantitative feedback, such as your MPs. Four, must have number nine. We have to have a gold standard orientation experience while online advising and virtual student meetings are new for many universities, online orientation doesn't have to sell the end of community building. This generation of student spends more time than any previous generation has on their screen and much of it is connecting digitally with friends and peers and checked. In many cases we're just catching up to our students. So on our website we have an entire online orientation shell which we can walk you through all of the important content to consider in your orientation and preparing students. Also, there's a ton of ways to be created with your orientation and with consideration to our technically savvy generation of students. Some institutions are using interactive instagram stories and Instagram facebook live. There are also some of them are also spreading orientation modules across several weeks to pace engagement and then supplementing that with virtual academic advising sessions. And last up, must have number ten. We need to get voice to voice with students during the start week. So we know that researchers have found a strong, positive correlation between building relationships with students and academic achievement. One idea is to have faculty members invite each student to meet with them virtually for a ten minute me and great meeting. Of course, academic advisors should definitely be tech doing at temp. Check with students to make sure that they've been able to get into class, ask about any issues, ask about first impressions to students really feel supported by reaching out, the faculty advisors are saying I care about you first and form botes, and I want you to be successful in this class and this is incredibly important and to developing the maintenance plan for students as a semester goes on. And now you get to ask me questions and I'll turn my light back on. There you go, Branda, thanks so much for those ten much tabs. And Yeah, we're ready for the QA portion now, and so if you join us a little bit like that's totally fine. There's a q and I kind of the bottom of your screen where you can as submit questions on anything that you sare heard. We've already got some questions in the happer. So, Miranda, I hope you're ready. Ready. All right. So we had a question come in before the Webinar from Jim.

Jim Asked how do you suggest teachers might be trained more thoroughly in the use of online education. I know that something that your friend and mine, Chiron Happas are chief academic officer, would really dig into. But you mentioned getting faculty involved in this process, and so anything else that you can think of related to faculty training and getting them involved in in these types of things. Yeah, I know she'R on does such a great time in this area. At the one thing that I can think of is as much as you can help see things from a different perspective, right. That's what sometimes sometimes a little tricky for faculty and teachers, is that you're coming in with your experience and your role and looking at the curriculum or looking at the online tools that you're using. But as much as you can get feedback or start to shift your mindset to approach this as a learner, I think the better you are are about navigating that particular program so maybe writing yourself down some questions and saying, if I was a student, what would I ask? What would be my main points of concern when I was a student? And if that's really hard for you to do because you've been in faculty or you've been a teacher for a really long time, then maybe asking an actual student to help give you some beedback about what the top areas are that they want to drive home or they want to understand in some particular content and then looking and seeing what they experience is from their angle, and usually that can help us as educational providers to make sure that their experience is good. But sometimes it's hard when you've been in a certain area in a certain role to see it from that to have that paradigm chest. All right, gring in. So I thanks, Miranda. I'm seeing a question from trevor. Trevor Rights. I work with a unique college access success program where we don't have a lot of interaction with incoming students until they graduate high school. What are some ideas to best connect with these students going forward and during covid will you have to say to trevor, Miranda, I would just say so it sounds like trevor is saying that there's not too much contact with those students until they actually graduate from school, and so they're quickly. It sounds like they are quickly trying to build a relationship with these students prior to them getting started in classes. Is that way her starting? That's how I'm reading it? Yeah, okay, okay. So what I would say is obviously contact. I'm a huge fan of having conversations. I'm a huge fan of making sure that it's not in this virtual kind of world. It's not just over the phone, but using zoom or Google meets and seeing that facetoface. And what I was strongly suggest is having this broken out over a period of time and using the first session just truly as I get to know yet and having that information of personal connection kind of flow back and forth. So I just think that that's very critical to building the trust and to really connecting the student to the person and that person representing the university, and I think oftentimes we have this tendency to just jump right into business and I think for our students, what they truly love about their college experience is being able to get that connection and feel like their university is a community. So I would say that as much as you can having weakly contact with those students leading up to when they start classes and making sure to insert some levels of just personal chat and not just all business, if you have the bandwidth to do that. I think that's a great way to build a relationship. All Right, trevor put thank you in the chat. So glad I was helpful. Free driver. Appreciate it. Shee. A question from Luis. Luis asks RESA's I really like the idea of a newsletter for parents. Any examples for the Community College Realm? What would you say...

...to that, Miranda? Any examples? So I think the big piece of this is your newsletter can be anything that you want it to be, and I would say that there are some great newsletters that also by a four year universities. But the big piece of this is your content, and what we know to be true about community colleges is there is a level of different needs and concerns of those students versus students that are attending, that are attending the for a year and not just because of it, you know, being in the first two years. They're just they can. Those demographics tend to need different things. So what I would say is back in retention in a pandemic, we talked about really having a round table and getting together and identifying what the needs of your specific population for your university is, and I think that that's a great idea to start with, and then making sure that you just all of your content in the newsletter or whatever you're choosing to send out to students is geared towards what the students are already telling you that they need to know about. I would say from the parent newsletter, I would just say parents typically want to know what is going to come out of all of this, right where their dollars are going, and so any in formation that you can give about the labor market, any information that you can provide in the parent newsletter about ways that students are using their degrees in their current space and with job opportunities and or what they can do later on. Highlighting students storises particularly impactful with parents. But those are some examples that I can think of how you can really connect parents. Whereas maybe a newsletter to a student might be around the activities or the things that they really enjoy doing, parents real pendant wants to focus on outcome. All right, you know, thanks for the question. Louis. Seeing a question come in from with Sam. With hom says. I'm from Beirut, Lebanon, and I work as a director of a newly established pretension unit. With the blast that happen in they rude the ongoing bad economic crisis and with covid nineteen were expecting a high number of dropouts in the coming year. Is there any reference or website I can check to try to save our situation? And obviously our hearts and our thoughts go up to Lebanon and Bey route specifically with the tragedy that happened, and you know we talked about this in the context to covid nineteen, but these are principles that can be useful in any type of situation. Doesn't have to be a pandemic. There are lots of ways that students can be impacted in and that thought of, you know, being hesitant to move forward can be impacted by lots of different things, not just not just an illness, and so I know we'll talk about the resources that we helix have have collected and have curated that are available to folks. But, Miranda, anything else, any other encouragement that you would send to to we says, which again our hearts, thoughts and prayers go out to Lebanon and and I would just say that the only thing that I can imagine that would be so critical and important right now for those students is just as much resource that you can make available and communicate and whatever way that is best to communicate right now. I would say that that is the best thing to do right and we do. We will go through the website and all of the resources to see how we can help, but I would say that the big focus and any kind of emergency situation is how can we support and provide resources to our impacted students. It's great and all the best to to you and yours. We saw on in in Lebanon in this kind of Siguaes into into the next question that I want to bring up. Miranda. You talked at the top about mental and emotional health being a significant factor for students as they make their decision, and so just any other insight that you have in terms of how these ten tips can help...

...boost students mental and emotional wellbeing, just any other angles you can take on that. Yeah, I mean I need to overt simple by this, but the big key is that the major focuses and all of the student experience and engagement webinars that we've done so far is really making it a point to leverage technology when needed, but as much as possible to get voice to voice and connection with as many students as you can, as often as you can, and the big piece is that one. We know that contact in that support is bound to help students in their mental health and in moments that they're struggling. But in addition to that, it also works as an intervention because you're likely to maybe catch some of those students who are on the verge of a breakdown, are really really struggling, and point them to any resources that you can offer as a university or just general, general resources. And so the hard part sometimes about inserting technology is that we lose that chance to to really help students and in kind of get up aulse and a check on them, at tempt check on them, and so I would say that while technology is fantastic and we certainly need times to make sure that it works hand in hand with voice to voice and with personal connection with faculty, Advisors and all of your staff, it's great. Thanks for that, Miranda, and obviously you know you're talking about communicating to as many students as possible. You made a point to help prioritize those conversations by identifying and helping those students who are struggling, and so the question that I would have is kind of how much is too much? You know, we worried about maybe smothering or helicoptering these students too much or maybe unintentionally driving them away or increasing their their disinterest, and so what would you say to those who have those concerns? Yeah, I mean, I think it is a very real concern. I will say that I would say that ultimately your students are doing great. I've never heard of or seen in my career at time where I could say rollment performance are our retention performance was impacted or negatively impacted as a result of students feeling smothered. So that is the good news that ultimately I don't think that it is a significant factor that's really really going to hurt you if you go overboard, whereas we know, on the other hand, if you don't do enough to contact and engage your students, that they don't feel a connection, if they are not feeling the care and support, they absolutely will leave. There's much less risk. There's less risk in going overboard than there is doing too little. But I would say that an important piece of that is making sure that you are identifying cools of students who are likely to have risk so that might be your new admissions coming in, but it also can be using that one, two, three text strategy and making sure that those particular students are then flag or additional support and resources within your contact strategy, and then that way you're not overwhelming your students who generally don't need it or like it, but you are getting to the ones that have raised their hand and said I'm struggling in those early moments. That's great, Branda. Thank you. We've got time for a few more questions, so if you haven't already, please use that Qa function there to send us a question, and thanks again to all those who have already has submitted questions. Let's stay on this topic of Student Parent Communication. You talked about, you know, response time, in the importance of response time. Any more specifics you have on an ideal response time and how much does it vary depending on the type of channel that's being used? Yeah, so what I would say as a general rule is if you can get back to students and parents within the same day and of the call, that is ideal. Twenty four hours is kind of D Max and I would...

...say it's an interesting thing to some extent. That's that's kind of happening in our current environment where I don't know about you all, book but when I leave a voicemail anywhere now, it's kind of in the back of my head almost to assume now that I'm not going to get a call back, and I know that's that's actually pretty terrible. But I would say that that we should surprise students with how quickly they get a response. Right. That is kind of what we're shooting for, is this seems like, oh my gosh, this is crazy, how fast I got to reply, and also being consistent with that right so one of the things that your student or your parent can look back and say as wow, they get back right away, and also knowing that maybe the one time a message or something slips through the cracks, that that is so unlike the university, because they always get back to me. So I think starting with that goal, in that vision and mind is really, really a great way to not necessarily focus on how long do you want to wait before it becomes kind of like the red line in the sand, until students and parents when they should receive a response, but how quickly? How can we create an environment where our staff members are really motivated and sire to get back to parents and students really quickly, but I would say no more than twenty four hours, and I think that that does not matter what channel, but I would make sure that you get back to them with sure. Okay, awesome, pis random. Looks like Trevor has a follow up pieces. I work for a CBIO and our own website isn't that strong with content. What are some of the most important things to have on there to make sure students can use it as a central hub and spend more time utilizing the resources who I would say that the most important thing that you can put on your website are the processes that you normally expect students to go through to be able to get and rolled or to register for classes. So it all kind of depends on what your website looks like or how user friendly your processes are. But is that really if you don't have a lot of bandwidth and your processes are pretty cumbersome? I would definitely lay out some expectations and a process guide that students can use a step by step way that if a student wanted to get completely enrolled into the university with minimal help from everyone and including timelines for how long certain things may take, that you would have that available and have access to that. I would obviously have an academic calendar. I would create a Faq so that students, whatever your frequent questions are, make sure that you're utilizing ones that are true to your student base. But I would say that those are some of the things that, from an enrollment operation standpoint, would be really critical and important if your goal is to have students really navigating from that website. Obviously, program plans classes that they need to complete some way for them to see, you know, what they have checked off, a degree audit of sort. So those are some of the things that, if you have quick and easy links to, are pretty critical. Okay, awesome, thanks, Brandon. Thanks Trevor, for for the question. Branda. Let's talk twagbags. Those one of the first must haves. It that you talked about. You talked about creating that physical and tangible connection with students through that swag. I'm curious if if digital swam I could also have an impact. You know, things like snap chat filters, zoom backgrounds, especially students are taking, you know, beginning this journey online. What impact could digital swag have on their ability to showcase that school pride. Yeah, I love it. I mean I certainly love it. Now. This is what I will say in depending on what your university environment is...

...right now, whether you're having in person or whether you're completely online. I know that ferries across the country, but I would say to some extent maybe there's potential for our students right now to have a little bit of virtual overload. I mean they were already doing it to some extent socially and personally. Now they might be working virtually now they also might be attending virtually. I think there is something to be said for students perceiving something in the mail that they can touch and that they know that one day, when kind of our world returns to normal, they can wear. So I would say just depending on your area and depending on what your current setup is with attendance. The second to make here I would say you might want to hold back any additional virtual things or limited if your students might be getting a little bit overloaded by it. All right, all good things. I don't think I see any more questions in the qua or the chat, and so thanks to everybody who submitted question. For Your tennis before we go really quick, we just want to again share the resources that Helix Education has made available to a just to you, in this online transition. As we thought about it, we've casted them within these four pillars of quality online education. We handed at them at the beginning and so here they are kind of in all their majesty. Today's pillar that we focused on was online student experience and engagement, but as we think about this transition, there's a lot more to that. We talked about student and parent expectation management. I think we touched on that in a few of these must have just in terms of making sure that there's clear and concise expectations for students and their parents into what this new normal is going to look like. We also talk about things at the level of institutional online readiness. How can your entire institution organization better prepare themselves for the unique challenges and opportunities that are present by being a primarily online instruction institution at this time? And speaking of teaching and learning, that's the last pillar that we have, the online teaching and learning experience. How do we continue to achieve great outcomes for our students when we're doing this teaching primarily, how can faculty continue in their mission of communicating their expectations and their expertise in their curriculum to students in that setting? And so how Helix Education can help across these pillars is we have been delivering quality online outcomes for students for the past few decades now, and so we see this as transitioning to online quality education from emergency remote teaching. When when the pandemic really first hit, that first wave there in March, we had a moment's notice essentially, and hire it to to try to transition online and to keep everybody safe. And so, as we adapt and we transition to fault two thousand and twenty and beyond, that emergency remote learning isn't going to be quite enough to satisfy the needs of students, of parents, of a creditors of the Department of Education and other folks. And so we need to ensure that this student experience remains highly intentional and remains emblematic of what you would want to offer as your institution, how you want your introduction to be identified, whether courses are taken on campus or online. And again it's about building that confidence, building the knowledge base of your students and your staff as well. And so to that and Helix has assembled guides, rubricks, templates, many other resources revolving around those four pillars to help you accelerate your transition to online and continue to drive exceptional online students, the kind of quality of the students, parents, accreditors and others expect. And so again, their highlight around these these four pillars introduction, online readiness, the online teaching and learning experience, online student experience and engagement and student and parent expectation management. And you can find out more about the pillars themselves on our website, as well as, once again, all the different types of resources that are available assessment, row bricks, how to guides, professional development and training,...

...including these webin artist, as well as podcasts that we've done around these topics. We've also got, as Moraniment, we got some foundational templates and benchmarking KPI documents, things that you can download and fill out for your institution to assess kind of where you are and how you can improve in each of these areas. And so the moment you've been waiting for. Where can you find all these things? So I'm going to post these in the chat as well, and so you can go to Helix Educationcom, new future. That's our website. We can access all of these resources that we've talked about, these different categories, as well as learn more about the different pillars of a quality online education and how we can assist you in those ways. We'd also love to delve more into your specific situation to see how we can help, and you can get that ball rolling by sending us an email at new future info at Helix Educationcom. That email will go to handful of us and we'll connect you with the right people who can help you dig more deeply into your situation and how Helix Education can help. And again, besides the different resources that are available there, we've got will have this Webinarn't there, as well as pass webinars that we've done, podcast loads of things there to help you all along the way. We're going to be continuing this webinar series as well as long as we've got we've got an interest and I think that interest remains, and so be on the lookout for invitations to additional webinars as we've dive into topics related in to these four pillars of quality online education. So one last time, we're going to post our website right there, Helix Educationcom. New Future and are email address. New Future Info at Helix Educationcom. And again, those are in the chat if you like to copy and paste out of there. Miranda, thank you so much for your time and for your expertise and for your answers. It was great to hear from you. Thanks to all of our attendees. Thank you for the privilege of your time. We really appreciate you spending it with us. Please stay safe, have a great rest of your day and week and we look forward to interacting with you more in the future. Take care, everybody. Thank you everyone. Attracting today's new post traditional learners means adopting new enrollment strategies. Helix educations data driven, enterprize wide approach to enrollment growth is uniquely helping colleges and universities thrive in this new education landscape, and Helix has just published the second edition of their enrollment growth playbook with fifty percent brand new content on how institutions can solve today's most pressing enrollment growth challenges, downloaded today for free at Helix Educationcom. Playbook. You've been listening to enrollment growth university from Helix Education. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show and Itunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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