The New Design Future of Campus Planning Post-COVID

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Steve Morley, Director of Campus Planning at Credo joined the podcast to talk about approaching campus planning in the short-term from both a public health and pedagogical focus.

Sometimes being familiar with a spacecan lead to almost a lack, an sensativity for what a space could benot just what a space has been for the last twenty years: You're listening to enrolment growth,university from helics education, the best professional development podcastfor higher education leaders looking to Growin Roman at their college oruniversity, whether you're looking for fresh and Roman growth techniques andstrategies or tools and resources. You've come to the right place. Let'sget into the show, welcome back to anroman growthuniversity, a proud member of the connect Evu podcast network, I'm EricWolson with helics education and were here today with Steve Morley, directorof campus planning at Crado Steve Welcome the show. Thank you Erik it'sgood to be here with. You. Wee really excited to have you here today to talkabout new trends in campus planning, post covid, but before we dig in, canyou give the listeners a little bit better understanding of both Crado andyour Wole? There sure so I serve as the director of campus planning at Cradoand Crado is a consulting firm that works with small colleges anduniversities across the country. We have areas that draw upon specialtiesin leadership strategies so working with strategic planning and perhapsboard development, an enrollment management helping to build the classfor each college university. We work with areas of students success, soerelly focused on the well being of our students once they are there and thencampus planning an architecture, and so that's the area that I work in. But Imentioned those areas because we see our work as interconnected, and so theway that we will work with campuses is drawing upon some of the expertise andcontent knowledge of each of those other areas to try to bring acomprehensive leadership to our our knowledge, and we are contributing tothat campus a so. We've formed the number of partner relationships withcampuses about four hundred different campuses across the country in thosedifferent four areas. It is a fascinating time to have your job andthrill. I Jin just to share what you're, seeing what you're learning and whatyou're working on right now Steve to kick us off today. Do you anticipatethe the short term, design future of college campuses being much moreheavily focused per se on Hfa systems, then collaborative learning, social andmaker spaces that have kind of owned the space for a while sure, yeah,absolutely you're right that these last eight months of our work, ha e lookedcollectively different than the prior years acumulatively leading up to thatpoint. In fact, even some of our designdsuggestions prior to this covid nineteen pandemic seem to be almostmoving in opposition with with some of...

...our current guidance, but I thinkthere's solutions that aren't either or there's both end and hopefully wellwe'll talk about that a little bit more, but to say that they will be focusedsolely on ach back systems might be placing a little bit too much focus onthe HBACK system itself, but I certainly would say giving attention tothe health of the SFACES that we are occupying, particularly as it relatesto the air quality. Maybe that be filtered air or the volume of outsideair will certainly be something that has taken into consideration for designan theyear and likely the the longer term future as well. Prior to thepandemic, we would have been able to see that there were some environmentson our campuses that already weren't the healthiest, because they did not introduce a healthy volume of of freshair into those spaces. You can think of maybe some of the traditional old mainbuildings on campus sut that thet did not have any sort of forced air or anysort of return air systems. It was old, radiator heat and likely sealed windowsfor the sake of of energy and conservation, so those faces probablyweren't the healthiest, even in a prior tovid nineteen environment. Now I thinkwe are seeing a number of our spaces being restricted because it is hard toget fresh or outside air into spaces that have been somewhat sealed forenergy consumption reasons, and so I do think campuses will be looking todevelop solutions that help to increase the air volume in those interiorlearning spaces and then also perhaps look at at spaces adjacent to indoorareas. You know outdoor areas, Patios rooftops those kinds of spaces in theright. I guess geographical conditions. You know where the climate would allow.That would be a healthy solution for what we see right now is as an airquality or an air health issue, and you teased on this little bit. This idea ofthis stratdle approach talk about approaching campus planning from apublic health focus versus a Pedagogi focus and in how we might be able to doboth sure. Well, and certainly, I would preface this comment with the publichealth and the safety and the well being of our campus community members.Ore Faculty staff and students needs to take first priority, and so I'm notarguing for the diminishment of that. What I am saying is that an exclusivefocus on guidance that only comes from public health may end up in someresults that that seem a bit foreign to maybe a Pedagogi. A program informedfocus public health would likely focus...

...on separating people from one anotherwell, but a pedagogi focus to campus planning intentionally seeks to bringcampus community members together and so that that separation versuscollision are ways that those two outcomes seem to be an opposition withone another right now we want to be able to controlone another's movement, so we're talking about entry points and probablydirectional traffic. You know how one moves through a CORIDOR or a serviceoriented space, whereas before we probably saw some of thoseopportunities for people to maybe not physically collide with one another,but but to run into one another with a level of Serandifity as a positivething. In fact we used to we refer to that as intentional Saran dipiny er. Weknow that there's a level of design that actually contributes to bringingpeople together to be able to see one another, maybe outside of the normalsetting so being able to see professors and staff and ind students intersectinga different points on campus that was intentionally designed and right now,public health would say no. We need to keep separated and we need to actuallykeep track of. Who is coming into contact with what, and so those twooutcomes seem to be a bit in opposition to one another or you know. Lastly, Ithink a you know. You know if I think ev our corridors. We would see those asmaybe spaces to pause and reflect, maybe either prior to going into aclassroom a to be able to kind of prepare for the discussion or theengagement tit's weint to take place there, or maybe to continue aconversation after a class that that took place inside of there and thatpause that reflection, that that space to to kind of linger or remain seems tobe in an opposition to some of the guidance t at would say, move separate,disperse, that's going to want to be the healthiest things. But, as youmentioned, I I think there is a both and I think there are some ways inwhich we can accomplish the public health guidance and recognizing thatneeds to take the priority, but also take on those kinds of solutions thatwould yield a pedigog or a program. First Focus and some of those thingsmight be in the ways that we create. Maybe thosebarriers or separations those those barriers that maybe keep people fromone another, could perhaps take on a program in formed purpose. Perhaps theycould be white boards that are utilized with some sort of prompt that allow forstudents to express their thoughts on a on a topic related to what's going onin our world, either politically or from justice perspective or from alearning perspective or from a health perspective, so utilizing thosebarriers as a means of of a learning environment, not just a a sterilebarrier environment. I could be one way...

...even the introduction of plant life,knowing that there's there's kind of a biophilic response that we have toplant life and also knowing that certain kinds of plants can actuallycontribute to positive indoor air quality. You can also create a apositive environment as as well. Lastly, I think of some of my colleagues whoare working in residential life on their campuses and have had toimplement some more stringent guidelines around personalization ofpeople's rooms and they're. Doing that, I think from sterilization an ability to keep thingsclean, but also probably to cominimize the disruption should they have to move mid semester or or make a move at some point. There'sjust fewer things to have to to take into account. The challenge of that isis that we know that there is a positive response to win. Any of us,particularly students who are moving to a new environment, are able to to seesomething familiar in an otherwise unfamiliar environment, so that abilityto to personaliize but's, even more so tobe able to see themselves on their campus. Be Able to make thatidentification with the campus is a really healthy perspective frompsychological sense of will being and just a growth and then, like, I said,an identification with the campus. So perhaps a campus could create somespaces on campus, where students are able to personalize some of the campusthemselve so that as they're navigating through it, they are able to seethemselves there. Quite literally Yo see something that represents theirhome culture or physically, whether it be an installation of some sort or mostof our campuses have some sort of digital signage, but perhaps theirstudents could contribute to some of the the scrolling screens around thosedigital signs around campus, just even as a way of being able to identify withthe space and for the space to maybe not seem quite as sterile as it perhapswould otherwise. So there's a lot that that could go into that really campusby campus, but I think generally looking at that, as as a both and rather than an either or in thesolution. Development is key for for just healthy, ongoing engagement withstudents on campus you're having so many of these similar conversations andconsults that Camvus is all across the country. Right now give us a sneak peakbehind the seems. Look. What does that process? Look like of evaluating yourexisting physical spaces to figure out? How can we make the most of what wealready have sure? Absolutely, and that's that's just it it's! It islooking at the resources that a campus currently has as just that they areassets. They are resources, they're, not liabilities, I think, of...

...at the end of February, early March N,when many most campuses were dispersing, their students off of campus physicalspace was almost seen as an antagonist. It's what we need to get away from, andso t's. Now that we are looking at what reemerging back on the campus lookslike it would be taking stock of each of the facilities and grounds resourcesfor their potential. It's easy for our campuses to take stock of theclassrooms that were already identified as such, your registrar from a spaceinventory perspective. Those were already on the list, so we already knewthose classroom spaces. The next step was evaluating what are other spacesthat could be utilized in a different manner than they have been up to thispoint, and so that has required. Quite frankly, just a different level ofthinking, sometimes of being familiar with a space, can lead to almost a lackof sensitivity for what a space could be not just what a space has been for.The last twenty years, and so a couple of examples of that some of ourcampuses with their their theater areas. First of all, those theater areas arelarge enough that they could easily be utilized from a social adistancingperspective for the instances when campuses are going to have larger classgatherings, they would be able to easily disperse a students throughoutthose spaces, but also the gathering areas, just outside of theater spaceswere built intentionally for the prefunction of a crowd gathering beforea theater performance and then probably an intermission and then gatheringafter the performance. Well, it's very likely that those theater performancesare not going to take place, at least in the same manner or concentration asthey did prior, so those otherwise kind of intermission or prefunction.Gathering areas now should be seen a as a resource to perhaps meet some otherneeds and those other needs could be class or they could be maybe pop upmeal distribution, centers or they could be heather areas to to hostcampus life events, or even Student Affairs or student clubs ffairs to beable to increase awareness and interest. So part of it is working with theexisting space inventory, those spaces that you already knew to count on likeclassrooms, but then it was taking a stock and I look at other spaces thatcould perhaps be utilized in in a different way as they. They have beenup to this point and looking at those areas for the asset that they cancontribute to our scenario, development, and so we've looked at those and thenwe've also looked at even some of our time like how we've gone aboutscheduling classes. How might we be able to look at the clock or thecalendar, perhaps in a different way?...

Might we need to to evaluate that? Forinstance, a number of campuses developed, kind of a Monday cohort aWednesday cohorn Friday cohort for certain courses or for certain campuslife events. So then already began o to look at scheduling a bit differently,and I know some campusees even extended that into Saturday's planning. So, in order tocreate a little bit more paridy ind their scheduling, it was helpful ifthey had basically on Monday Wednesday, Friday, Tuesday, Thursday Saturdayschedule and it wasn't a full day Saturday, but it helped them reallyextend some of their flexibility of their their usage. And so that's anexample where the first two items I mentioned were really an evaluation ofspace and then the third item is really more of an evaluation of an assumption. You know the assumptionof time or the assumption of calendar and some campuses have thought of somecreative ways of looking at the calendar and time differently. Let'slook at one last design straddle how do you approach the design challenge ofcreating an incredibly safe environment for our students, our faculty at ouradministrators without creating an environment that feels overly sterile,overly unfriendly sure, I think that's part of the challenge, certainly mayberelated back to save the examples from my friends inresidential life or or even some of the corridors that used to be vibrant withlife and now are just filled with instruction on walk this way Ac to thisdirection. I think of some of our larger volume spaces such as learningCommons and then some other spaces that were created to be more pop up learningCommons. Just from a an occupancy perspective, those areas were oftendeveloped in order to be able to kind of bring people into some sort of s mea place to be able to focus on their work, but also to be able to perhaps beseen in the midstof of that work as well, and so, as I look at some of thetransformations of learning, commomns there's often been a promp around theopen concept, say the open office concept or the open learning Commonsconcept, and now we're needing to to close that back down a bit or to createsome more partitioning. That is that's where I'll go back to something Imentioned earlier. Is those partitions, don't necessarily need to be sterileblank and nonfunctioning. In fact, I think they should be the opposite.Those should be spaces that are filled with kind of the vibrant activity ofstudent life of maybe university branding. Perhaps those are thelocations for for poster sessions to basically be displayed or for digitaldisplays to be implemented in order to to solve that solution that is callingfor for partitioning, but that doesn't necessarily mean that t has to be blankor that it needs to be sterile. It could be something that continues tosupport and resource the activity of...

...university life, so to have partitionsthat do perhaps create some separation from one group of students studying inone area and another group of students studying in another. It could be just ablank white board or it could be a whiteboard with promps to be able towrite a response. I could be something that's branded related to the athletic deparpement and what theschedule will look like for upcoming Games. It could be an opportunity ifyou, if your program had a a studio art program for for those art majors to beable to actually create artistically these barriers or do maybe it could beas simple as movable shelves in order to be able to display smaller items,but there's actually some opportunity here for for installation art. That isalso serving another purpose in terms of creating those kinds of separations,and so I know of another campus that is looking at doing a similar item to thatthat students are creating some of their barriers that they intend toprobably make even more use of as the weather worsons- and you know, studentsfrom their engineering area are probably looking at that from materialsand a handling perspective. Art Students are looking at that from whatkind of different installation art could we think of to create those kindsof barriers? Theater programs are looking at. How could we go and usethose as ways of both advertising for our performances by using some of thestage props or those kinds of things in different venues? And then, as hiymentioned, athletic departments are using those as opportunities to toinvest in some university branded boards that are creating separationright now and then well, basically be installed into their into their arenasin different locations in a more permanent sense and so there'sopportunities to meet those those needs around creating a safe environmentwithout it just being sterile or bland, and I think many of those examples alsoinvolve students in that, which, I think is, is a helpful strategy as wellthat that Ind d of itself reduces some of the stickerility. It's not justsomething that was installed. T was something that they got to help make orbuild or provide for their own experience. Steve Super Helpful anyfinal next teps advice for institutions looking back at their existing twothousand and twenty five two Thusanda thirty campus plans now and wonderingif they need to start over or not what's their next step. Sure now,that's great! You know I really don't. I would hope that there was enoughstrategic guidance for their their long range planning that they would not feelas though they need to start over. I do think they will need to evaluate theirtheir plans for the level of agility...

...that they provide even thinking of notonly what are, we perhaps designing this space for currently. But whatcould we already see that it might need to be an its two point, O version? Andso I don't think this necessarily changes any colleges or universities.Why? But how and what we do, may look a bit different and so I would sayagility and the ability for some of the solutions that were implementing nowhere in the fall of two thousand and twenty, let's be able to be utilized ina different manner, maybe in fall of two thousand and twenty one and thenmaybe in n Yehat, a different manner in the fall of two thousand and twenty sixwould be the wisest possible investment of resources that we could see one time,expenses that really only meet one need right now I would be, you know,challenged to prioritize, but now i's kind of a moment. That's reallydemanding a greater level of agility in our solution: Development Solutions Notonly for the neaer term but for the long term as well, Steve thanks so muchfor your time today. What's the best place for listeners to connect with youif they have any follow up questions sure I would welcome furtherconversation. So my email is s Mor Ley, so s Morley at Crado, hier, edcom,that's CR, Edo, hi, Gher edcom would welcome to emaill there or my numberfeel free to reach out to me witbe three, three, six, six, zero, three,six zero, two one and I would welcome you- know engagement. There feel freeto reach out the CRADOS website or my email or phone, and I look forward tocontinuing any conversation that w? U. That would be helpful, uesome thanksagainst so much for joining us. Today's Steve Yeah, thank you. Er attractingtoday's new post, traditional learners means adopting new enrolment strategies.Kelics educations data driven enterprise, wide approach to enrollmentgrowth is uniquely helping colleges and universities thrive in this neweducation, landscape and Helox has just published the second edition of theirenrollment growth playbook. With fifty percent brand new content on howinstitutions can solve today's most pressing andromant growth challengesdownload it today for free at Helocks, Educationcom playbook you've been listening to enrolmentgrowth university from helicks education to ensure that you never missan episode subscribe to the Showin Itunes or your favorite podcast player.Thank you so much for listening until next time.

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